35% infants suffer from baby bottle tooth decay | chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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35% infants suffer from baby bottle tooth decay

Consumption of sugary foods and nighttime bottle feeding is one of the most common factors of tooth decay among infants. A study conducted by the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh has found the above results.

chandigarh Updated: May 02, 2013 21:07 IST
HT Correspondent

Consumption of sugary foods and nighttime bottle feeding is one of the most common factors of tooth decay among infants.


A study conducted by the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh has found the above results.

The study conducted on 150 children of tricity by the paediatric unit of Oral Health Sciences Centre of PGIMER found that baby bottle tooth decay-- as the decay of children teeth is commonly known -- is a serious oral health problem affecting nearly 35% of the child population in the age group 2-5 years.

The study found that besides consumption of sugary foods and night time bottle feeding, certain behavioural and social factors such as sharing of utensils with the child, kissing on child's lips, working status of the mother and low birth weight babies with improper development of teeth (hypoplastic lesions) also have strong bearing on the development of cavities in children.

"A little effort on the part of parents with basic home care measures can prevent this condition from occurring which includes tooth-brushing as soon as the first tooth erupts," said Dr Ashima Goyal, professor, department of oral health sciences.

She added that the using a speck of fluoride toothpaste on tooth brush after two years of age, night time brushing and tongue cleaning with brush assisted by parents, decrease in frequent snacking especially those containing sugar and avoiding sharing of utensils and kissing the child on lips.

According to experts, it manifests as destruction of primary or milk teeth within months of their eruption.

The dental caries in children teeth spreads rapidly and by the time it comes to the notice of the parents, almost whole of the coronal structure (crown portion of the tooth) is lost.

Lecture on dental care today
The fourth public lecture in the golden jubilee public lecture series will be on 'dental care,' delivered by Dr Ashima Goyal from the department of oral health sciences, PGIMER on May 3 at 12.30pm on the ground floor of the New OPD Block, PGIMER.