35 PMET questions incorrect: Petitioners | chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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35 PMET questions incorrect: Petitioners

As many as 35 questions were wrong in the May 17 Punjab Pre Medical Entrance Test (PMET), two petitioners told the Punjab and Haryana high court on Friday.

chandigarh Updated: Jun 20, 2015 08:53 IST
HT Correspondent

As many as 35 questions were wrong in the May 17 Punjab Pre Medical Entrance Test (PMET), two petitioners told the Punjab and Haryana high court on Friday.

The two petitioners --- Divesh Sharma and Trishika Verma — were allowed to examine the question paper. A total of 32 candidates had moved the court on May 28, seeking cancellation of exam, citing various reasons.

The petitioners had alleged that of the 200 multiple- choice questions, many had glaring mistakes. There While some questions didn’t have correct answer option, some questions didn’t make any sense at all, they claimed, adding that there were many repetitions. The test was conducted by Baba Farid University of Health Sciences (BFUHS), Faridkot.

Subject experts, who had validated the answer key of the test, were also present in the court. The next hearing in the case is on June 22.

Earlier, the HC was told that a set of 15 questions supplied by 10 petitioners were examined by experts, who found the allegations made by students invalid.

In their petition, the students had alleged that the BFUHS had tried to conduct the examination for admission to MBBS and BDS courses in medical colleges of the state in a "clandestine" manner. For the three-hour examination, in which 15,000 candidates appeared, only one centre was set up, they had submitted.

This resulted in traffic chaos and harassment to students and nearly 300 candidates could not take the test. The petitioners have demanded a retest.

The students have also sought directions to the university to reveal the entire procedure/steps taken for the conduct of the PMET. The petitioners alleged that the university could not maintain secrecy in the matter as students were allowed to sit in groups and invigilators were seen talking on the phone. Some students were allowed to appear in the examination after the scheduled start (11am) of the test, they claimed.