AAP ka Baap

  • Khushwant Singh, Hindustan Times, Chandigarh
  • Updated: Feb 22, 2015 11:17 IST

“Sirji, wake up, Common Singh is here to see you,” yelled my house help, which woke me out of my afternoon siesta. “Usher him in quickly, I barked, “He is no longer Common Singh. He is the new Khaas Aadmi. Don’t you know what has happened in Delhi?”

“Sat Sri Akal, Sirji,” said Common Singh, “Vekhya Dilli wich ki hoya. Balle balle ho gayi,” he said in an excited tone. “Congratulations on the emphatic victory, Common Singh. Very good,” I said, “I think it is a very important intervention in modern India’s history. The AAP’s performance or non-performance will set the future agenda for the country.”

“Kejriwal ney phattey chak dittey. People had ruled him out. Sirji, even you had called him Delhi’s new Muhammad-bin-Tughlaq in one of your articles when he had become chief minister the first time. Now you must eat your words.”

“Common Singh, why should I take my words back? He still has to prove himself as an able administrator; and by the way, I got massive hate mail from other Common Singhs because of that piece. But my friend, Common Singh, I am interested not because I like to see Arvind Kejriwal lift the wooden planks. I’m excited at the result simply because the politics of arrogance that was threatening to engulf the nation has been brought to a halt, at least for the time being, until the Aam Aadmi becomes arrogant, which I hope not. Even Kejriwal attributed his earlier downfall to arrogance, which hurts people the most because it severs the communication with the government when it understands no language except adulation,” I reasoned.

“Sirji, every time I say something, you bowl a googly at me. What do you think will happen in Punjab? Will the Aam Aadmi Party make a clean sweep in 2017?”

Common Singh, I can’t predict what will happen in Punjab, because a lot will depend on how Kejriwal performs in Delhi.

However, with you, I can share what I feel should happen. First, I am with Kejriwal on doing away with this ghuggoo (VIP siren) culture. Believe me, you take the ghuggoo off one car and you will see it disappear from politics. You didn’t make education a criterion for joining politics, but this no-ghuggoo policy should create some vacancies indeed. But if you can’t run through a toll booth without paying tax, what’s the point in being in politics?

Secondly, the voters of Punjab should reject the parties and leaders who come up with only slogans and no action. You can live on promise for time, but if you fail to deliver, it’s time to meditate in Guppistan. Voters should be on the lookout for fresh candidates who do not carry the baggage of history. I don’t mean ignore history but start voting for the nominees who have learnt from it, not those who exploit it for votes. Driving by looking in the rear-view mirror can’t take Punjab forward. Resolve not to vote on the basis of religion, caste, creed, and class. Politicians should perform or perish; alright, ya?

My fifth wish is to see Punjab elect young, educated, robust political leaders, and wipe out the old political honchos. Ghar Wapsi to them. The state needs policy makers who don’t live in Jurassic era and are not entrenched as sharks in political waters.

“Sirji, if this happens, wah wah ho jau. The AAP will chak dey phattey in Punjab, too.”

Common Singh, the Delhi poll result was an evolution in Indian democracy, and the thing with evolution is that it is happening all the time. Who knows there might be an AAP ka Baap. khushwant.ahluwalia@gmail.com

also read

Councillor’s report card: A tongue-tied man, a job half-done
Show comments