Being brand Bhandarkar | chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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Being brand Bhandarkar

chandigarh Updated: Dec 19, 2012 10:59 IST
Archna Matharu
Archna Matharu
Hindustan Times
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Owing to the subjects he chooses to base his films on, National Award-winning Hindi film director, scriptwriter and producer Madhur Bhandarkar has created a brand for himself. Since most of his films, including Chandni Bar and Page 3, carried a message for the viewers at large, Madhur is now identified with churning out thought provoking material.


While in Amritsar on Sunday for an event, the director paid obeisance at Harmandar Sahib, and later talked about his style of filmmaking and the popularity of Punjabi music.

When asked about his reaction to criticism for creating stereotypical characters, Madhur says that he is in fact never judgmental while making a film and ‘only believes in putting down facts.’ Further adding that he likes the endings of his films to have a sting in the tail and to leave a grey area for the audience to contemplate on, Madhur says, “From Chandni Bar to Heroine, I have always chosen the path of realism in my films. I make movies in a smaller budget, and yet, my films manage to get critical acclaim as well as box office success. They are neither commercial nor art; instead they follow the middle path.”

After the release of Madhur’s recent directorial venture, Heroine, more criticism came his way from the film fraternity for portraying the industry ‘in a harsh light’. “But when I chose to show the reality in films such as Chandni Bar and Fashion, I would do the same in Heroine. Besides, my aim while making movies is to make blatant and honest films with a lot of integrity,” claims Madhur.

Showering praises on Punjabis, the director applauded the region’s folk music for having retained its identity from the times of black and white films till today. “Punjabis are known for their magnanimity, big hearts and being larger than life. And Punjabi music is so catchy, that even people residing in south India enjoy it,” he says, adding that since India is a country of different languages and culture, cinema has scope for portraying all cultures.

Madhur recently represented India at the Cairo Film Festival as a jury member, and reveals he is presently enjoying some leisure time, listening to scripts and interacting with people. “2012 is coming to an end, and it has been a good year for Hindi cinema,” he smiles.

Although Madhur did not spill the beans about his upcoming projects, he did share that his next movie would be with UTV Motion Pictures (the third, after Fashion and Heroine) and another with T-Series.