Chandigarh schools lack right conditions for left handers

  • Vishav Bharti, Hindustan Times, Chandigarh
  • Updated: Aug 13, 2016 19:37 IST
During a survey, children said they faced pressure from family members to stop being left handed, saying they might find it difficult to survive in a largely right-handed world. (HT Photo)

In city schools, around 10% of the students are left handers, a PGIMER survey has found. But these children face a lot of problems.

The PGIMER recently surveyed all 107 government schools of city. The survey found that out of 50,000 students in all these schools, around 5,000 were left handers.

The PGIMER study found that many children voiced their difficulties in using scissors, cutting with knife or playing some musical instruments. During the survey, some of the children said they had faced pressure from family members to stop being left-handed, saying they may find difficulty surviving in the righthanded world, the study observed.

Dr Bhavneet Bharti, an additional professor in the paediatrics department, PGI, who carried out the survey, said, “Schools must take care of needs of these children.” She said such children as well as teachers required special training regarding positioning of hand and notebook during writing, cursive writing and sitting arrangement for them.

She also said various tools especially made for left-handers, such as scissors, knives, musical instruments and cursive writing
books, were available online.

No clarity on handedness

Experts remain unsure how handedness emerges in a developing child. Against this backdrop, a number of cultural myths have grown up around the differences between left and right-handers. First of all, there really is no such thing as strict left- or right-handedness. Most people can do something with their weaker hand.

Myths about left-handers

Left-handers largely are introvert, intelligent and creative. Left-handed people die earlier and have poor immune system and they are persecuted.


Lefties have an advantage in many sports.

We get more mixed-handed as we get older.

Left-handers are less likely to be left-brain dominant for language.

Left handers' day celebrated

International left hander’s day was celebrated by the Social Paediatrics division of Advanced Paediatrics Centre, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, at Govt Primary School, Sector 23, Chandigarh on Thursday.

Dr Bhavneet Bharti, additional professor, at PGIMER, elaborated upon various difficulties faced by left-handed children. Dr Bharti interacted with a group of left-handed children of the school and enquired about the areas where they faced difficulties in school as well as at home. The school principal said she herself was surprised and did not anticipate that so many children in her school were lefthanded.

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