Court terms police theory a ‘figment of imagination' | chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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Court terms police theory a ‘figment of imagination'

In its judgment for the acquittal of the accused in the Dimpy murder case of 2006, the district court has given a severe dressing-down to the UT police for shoddy investigation and failure to gather evidence.

chandigarh Updated: Feb 19, 2014 09:58 IST
HT Correspondent
Dimpy murder case

In its judgment for the acquittal of the accused in the Dimpy murder case of 2006, the district court has given a severe dressing-down to the UT police for shoddy investigation and failure to gather evidence. This comes close on the heels of the police being red-faced after failing to prove the primary allegations in the robbery at a Tanishq jewellery store in Manimajra.


Prabhjinder Singh, alias Dimpy, a notorious gangster who was facing over a dozen cases of contract killing and abduction, was gunned down in his car by two motorcycle-borne assailants on July 7, 2006, near Lake Club. After a prolonged trial, additional district and sessions judge Shalini S Nagpal, on February 5, acquitted gangster-turned-politician Jaswinder Singh, alias Rocky, the lone accused arrested in the case.

The detailed judgment accessed by HT terms the entire case a “figment of imagination”. The court did not acknowledge the alleged confession by Rocky in which he had named three others for the murder conspiracy as “Ravinder alias Bhura, Sunil Vakil and Surinder Singh”. The basic police theory was that Dimpy was killed by Bhura and Sunil using Rocky’s weapon; but this was not found credible as Bhura, who was killed in October 2006, was lodged in a Meerut jail at the time of the murder. Investigators could not find anyone who matched the antecedents of the others allegedly named. The team recorded the statement of an advocate — Sunil Kumar — but found that he had no involvement.

Worse, the police failed to even connect the alleged murder weapon — a .45-bore pistol “recovered from Rocky” — with the crime. This was because certain Supreme Court judgments say that “the recovery of weapon after nine months of the crime cannot be tagged with the crime as it has exchanged a number of hands”. Further, the cops failed to prove that the bullets that hit Dimpy were fired from the same pistol.

After the acquittal, the police are awaiting the detailed order to file an appeal, if any.

UP gangster was named too

The police, after Rocky’s arrest, had alleged that both Rocky and Dimpy were members of UP-based Mukhtar Ansari gang and carried out kidnappings involving some of the big businessmen and charged huge amounts in ransom. Rocky allegedly parted ways with the Ansari gang and joined hands with a UP-based politician. Then, police claimed, Rocky had come in contact with another gangster, Ravinder Bhura, who had also left the Ansari gang. Bhura provided shooters to Rocky for killing Dimpy, said the police. But none of that could be proved.

Inspector Amanjot in dock again

The court in its order has come down heavily on UT police inspector Amanjot Singh, who is already under suspension over allegations of extortion and criminal intimidation in another matter. Terming him as an “interested person not free from doubt”, the court has taken into consideration the allegations levelled against him by Rocky. “Inspector Amanjot Singh had made a false case to gain mileage as they (police) had received flak for not solving the case,” Rocky had said, “I was in Delhi at the time when police showed my arrest from the city.”