Excitement turns into anxiety in crowded nervous nineties | chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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Excitement turns into anxiety in crowded nervous nineties

chandigarh Updated: May 31, 2012 00:15 IST
HT Live Correspondents

College admission cut-offs look set to shoot through the roof this year, as the number of Class 12 students with a score of 90% has nearly doubled in the city.

While last year the number was round 400, it has neared 700 this year. More than 400 of these students belong to the city's 23 private schools and the 37 government schools have 160 such students, many of whom have a 100% score in more than one subject.

Leading the charts, Bhavan Vidyalaya in Sector 27 has got more than 90 students in the bracket, while SD Public School, Sector 32, has 85; and Vivek High School and Sacred Heart School have over 40 each. Mount Carmel and DPS also have over 20 students each with a score above 90%.

To make the competition tougher, there will be a large number of students from outside the city too, especially those from Haryana and Punjab who come to the capital town for commerce and non-medical streams. In fact last year, students from Delhi had also approached the city after the cut-offs in the national capital touched 100%.

Of the most sought courses, B.Com in SD College, Sector 32, had a cut-off of 94% in the first counseling. In Government College, Sector 11, last year those with 90% and above were given seats in first counseling.

MCM DAV's last year's cut-off in B.Com was 94.4%, while in DAV-10, B.Com seats went to those with 85% or above. At Guru Gobind Singh Khalsa College, Sector 26, the cut-off was 80%.

Meena Prabhakar, principal, SD College-32 agrees that the competition would be harder. "Since we are the first choice of students not only from the city but also from the neighboring states, there is once again going to be cut-throat competition. I just hope all those who deserve to be in the college get admission."

She had some advice for those who have got less than 90%: "If you do not get admission in the college of your choice, don't be depressed. You can always improve."