Groove gurus | chandigarh | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jan 21, 2018-Sunday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Groove gurus

In 2004, four music addicts came together to pursue their passion. Today this Delhi-based music band, known as Jalebee Cartel, has single handedly put India on the map of international electronic dance music (EDM) genre.

chandigarh Updated: Apr 29, 2012 18:22 IST
Vivek Gupta

In 2004, four music addicts came together to pursue their passion. Today this Delhi-based music band, known as Jalebee Cartel, has single handedly put India on the map of international electronic dance music (EDM) genre.

"Choosing EDM was a conscious decision. We wanted to sound different because most of the bands at that time were into Asian underground music, Indo-western music and so on," says Ash Roy, one of the band members, who, along with fellow member Ashvin, played techno and house music in city on Friday evening.

Ash, percussionist and vocalist, says that they had to struggle a lot in the beginning since EDM wasn't popular in India. "We even performed our gigs for free. But things have changed today and much of the credit goes to the tech-savvy generation, which feels deeply connected with this genre of music," says Ashvin, who synthesizes on laptop.

He adds, "We do more than 130 shows a year across India which shows that there is audience for EDM."

Ash feels that EDM is new-age music. "While technology has brought people together, it has also provided us with immense possibilities to explore music," says Ash, while informing that more than 150 of their tracks are available in the digital world.

Ashvin feels that music scene in India is changing: "There are listeners in big cities who go to clubs to listen to different artistes rather than just enjoying any one kind of music. Thanks to the club scene in cities such as Mumbai and Delhi which are promoting different kinds of live music - jazz, underground and EDM and bringing music lovers and artistes together."

Ash says that though here EDM is still upbeat and fast music, many EDM artistes world over play slow-paced music too and that the trend will trickle down in India. "It may take some time because clubs in India don't remain open for long hours unlike western countries where they are open for days together and that gives artistes ample time to perform a range of music."

"But we have given many daylong performances at clubs and wove different elements in our music," says Ash.

On how the equipment has changed, Ashvin says, "Technology has developed rapidly. With sophisticated software, producing music has become easier. But what matters in EDM is individuality. Youngsters should not copy anybody, rather they should play their self."

Every summer the band bases itself in Berlin and performs live in many European clubs. They say that playing outside India is always a different experience since they understand this genre better, as they have grown up on it. "What makes this music acceptable everywhere is that it has very less lyrical content, which, in way, removes the language barrier. In India, EDM has a lot of scope and as technology is becoming more accessible to people, it will introduce them to new experiences each day."

Other members of the band comprise Arjun Vagale (who mixes electronics on laptop), and G-Arjun, who is the bass guitarist.
Where did the name Jalebee Cartel come from? "It just clicked!" smiles Ashvin.