Hooligans on prowl, target cars outside houses in wee hours | chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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Hooligans on prowl, target cars outside houses in wee hours

Of late, city residents are waking up to the rude shock of seeing windowpanes of their cars damaged. During the last 10 days, hooligans have been targeting cars parked outside houses across the city.

chandigarh Updated: Jun 26, 2012 17:05 IST
Monica Sharma

Of late, city residents are waking up to the rude shock of seeing windowpanes of their cars damaged. During the last 10 days, hooligans have been targeting cars parked outside houses across the city, breaking windowpanes and shattering the peace of mind of residents.


On an average, a car is found with broken windowpanes every five days in the city.

Hooligans had struck in Sectors 8, 32, 46 and other southern sectors.

Six cases of damage to cars have been reported to the Chandigarh police in the last 10 days.

All incidents had one thing in common - miscreants striking on the wee hours and mostly venting ire on cars. So far, police have failed to establish whether they belong to one gang or not.

"The incidents of lawlessness have brought to fore complete inability of the Chandigarh police to maintain law and order and to ensure safety of life and property," says Nagender Sharma, a resident of Sector 32.

Savita Kohli, whose Honda City car was damaged recently, said, "We woke up to the noise of windowpanes being broken. Police should punish the guilty severely as such an act causes harassment to residents."

Hooligans have been striking at a time when the Chandigarh police are claiming to have stepped up night patrolling.

They are apparently taking advantage of the fact that so many cars are parked in front of houses, particularly outside flats in southern sectors.

"What encourages them is the fact that there is hardly any police patrolling after 2 am," says Ajay Jagga, a city-based advocate putting up in Sector 22.

Police attribute the menace to the increasing number of paying guest accommodations in the city and greater socialisation among youngsters. "Society has turned permissible to greater socialisation over the past few years and open meetings between youngsters of opposite sex are no more a taboo. But it has its own set of problems and complications," says a station house officer of Chandigarh police on the condition of anonymity.

"Sometimes unfulfilled desires, turned-down proposals leave youngsters jilted and full of vengeance," says another police officer.

This is not all. The menace is also being attributed to professional jealousy.

The rise of one often results in disappointment and anger among peers and taking revenge on vehicles is just another mode of giving vent to the anger.

JS Syju, who is working as deputy general manager with Food Corporation of India, had recently claimed that his car was damaged owing to professional jealousy.

Superintendent of police (operation) RS Ghumman says, "Many reasons can be attributed to the trend. Generally, it is the tendency to break law among youngsters."

He adds that stringent steps will be initiated to check the menace as the safety and security of residents was of prime importance for Chandigarh police.