I am in for the long haul: Serial entrepreneur Mohit Aron

  • Aneesha Bedi, Hindustan Times, Chandigarh
  • Updated: Aug 06, 2015 11:18 IST

Pathankot-born Mohit Aron (42) had a dream. He wanted to change the world. He didn’t know how he would fulfil it. But he didn’t stop dreaming.

What he did know was that he had infinite passion for computer sciences. Son of a civil officer, Aron spent his early years in smaller towns of Punjab like Firozpur and Sangrur and moved to Chandigarh at the age of 11 and fell in love with the city. He is a former student of St John’s School and DAV College.

A PhD from Rice University in Texas, USA, when Aron was confronted with a choice between joining academia or creating new products, he obviously chose the latter.

Now, 20 years later, Aron has written the Google File system and created his first data storage company Nutanix which is valued at Rs 2 billion. In June, he emerged with his latest company Cohesity – a technology start-up of 55 employees that focuses on consolidating secondary storage in order to make data centres run more efficiently.

“We are the first ones to look at this space [where data is stored] comprehensively and come up with a solution that can potentially erase all problems related to inefficiencies in data storage and data chaos. So, our approach is unique - we have an edge where others may not,” says Aron, adding, “The only thing I can tell you is the vision is huge. It could take a considerable amount of time, but I am in for the long haul. It’s not about money or fame... it is about making a difference.”

An office in City Beautiful?

Although the firm has an office that will be functional in Banagalore, the tech entrepreneur shares, “I am really keen to open an office here in Chandigarh eventually. My dream is to have my leg in two places - US and Chandigarh. I think it is a very peaceful place and this would be my way of giving back to this city that gave me so much.”

A great admirer of Steve Jobs, Mohit Aron believes India has always been a late adopter of new technologies and solutions. “It’s about time we change that,” he says.

On the other hand, talking of how tough it was as an Indian to adjust in the US, Aron says, “Altough it was tough initially, I’ve come to realise Indians are considered very reliable. We have a very strong family support system and one requires that so as to have minimal distractions when you plan to do something as big as starting your own company. Americans tend to go through more personal turmoil that impacts professional performance.”

Technology and time to wait for none

When asked about how he plans to take things from here, Aron, ever an optimist, says, “I like to take it one step at a time. There is no point in planning too much. Times and technology change rather fast. Of course, I have thoughts. I have a way of looking at things but it’s not necessary that what I am thinking of today, I’ll do tomorrow.”

also read

Councillor’s report card: A tongue-tied man, a job half-done
Show comments