IN HIS MUSICAL FOOTSTEPS | chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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IN HIS MUSICAL FOOTSTEPS

Music lovers’ archives are incomplete without his tracks; he figures in the prized list of Punjabi singers who have truly contributed to Punjab’s music legacy. Now, Lakhwinder Wadali has another feather to add to his decorated cap — De Deedar — a single he launched online just recently.

chandigarh Updated: Mar 24, 2014 12:57 IST
Usmeet Kaur

Music lovers’ archives are incomplete without his tracks; he figures in the prized list of Punjabi singers who have truly contributed to Punjab’s music legacy. Now, Lakhwinder Wadali has another feather to add to his decorated cap — De Deedar — a single he launched online just recently.


Hailing from a rich family legacy in music, from the Patiala gharana, Lakhwinder received guidance in classical music by his father, Ustad Puran Chand Wadali.

About carrying forward the Wadali Brothers’ legacy, he says, “I am blessed to have trained under the Wadali Brothers. My father has given me a strong foundation in classical music; now, I want him to be known by my name, that’s the biggest tribute I can offer him.”

About how his sir name has worked in his favour, professionally, Lakhwinder says, “There was a time when music companies used to ask for at least one track by Wadali Brothers on every album, for their albums to do well. But now, after the hard work I’ve put in, they open me with open arms, no strings attached.”

His recent song, De Deedar, has bagged thousands of likes on YouTube, besides receiving appreciation on social websites. About the song, Lakhwinder says, “I read Bulleh Shah’s poetry, but adapting a poem by a legend like Bulleh Shah into a song was a big responsibility.

Being an artiste, my aim is always to drive home the message through the poetry or lyrics. It is songs like these that represent our culture and literature, not the violent, vulgar genre. Punjab is about much more than what is being portrayed in these commercial songs.”

About swimming against the tide in the age of commercial music, he says, “Music companies asked me to collaborate with big rappers, the names of whom are selling like hot cakes. I, however, do not believe in collaborations if they hurt my lineage.”

To clear his stand, he adds, “It is not that I am against collaborations. In May this year, I would come out with an album called The Destination with Dr Zeus. I chose to work with him because I loved his work on Nusrat Fateh Ali khan — the tribute he gave him was commendable.”