Jus Reign reigns supreme | chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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Jus Reign reigns supreme

My son, however, feels that there is no such thing as ‘diaspora desi parents’ and that his mom and dad are matching clones of the types shown in the various parodies that Jus Reign produces. Just to give you an overview of the content in Reign’s comedies, the parents are shown badgering their children all day on just about everything writes Khushwant Singh

chandigarh Updated: Feb 24, 2014 11:21 IST


My son, however, feels that there is no such thing as ‘diaspora desi parents’ and that his mom and dad are matching clones of the types shown in the various parodies that Jus Reign produces. Just to give you an overview of the content in Reign’s comedies, the parents are shown badgering their children all day on just about everything and anything — ‘Why do you keep fingering the phone all day?’, ‘Why don’t you shop during sales only?’ ‘No, you can’t eat out!’ ‘Study or you’ll fail!’, ‘Tuition time!’ etc etc. The only hope for us parents is that we don’t seem to be the only guilty ones, given the lakhs of clicks on Reign’s videos.


Anyways, this messiah of deprived desi children, Jus Reign, was apparently in Chandigarh and I was ordered to track him down. The diktat was that I wouldn’t be considered a caring parent if I didn’t pull off this one. After all, I was an editor, columnist and an author.

Pricked the wrong way, there I was making frantic calls to my sources to find about Jus Reign. I finally traced him shooting for a Punjabi movie. He was a funny guy to meet, and after doing his ‘Yo man’, ‘Hey man,’ stuff with the teenagers, he got chatting with me about his journey as a vlogger.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/Popup/2014/1/Jus%20Reign_compressed.jpg

Obviously, his parents were pissed off with his idea of becoming a vlogger, but this 24-year-old (19 then) decided to stick to his passion. His first spoof was on desi parents, fodder for which he harvested from his own backyard. Jasmeet soon became Jus Reign, a name given by his cousin.



He also started spoofing on his experiences as a South Asian child in a white majority school. His video, What White Guys Say About Brown Guys, is epic and has over two million views. In the spoof, Jus Reign, through comedy, raises the racial prejudice he faced as a Sikh boy. "My brother and I were always termed as girls because of the bun on our heads, till we decided to pull down our trousers and show it off to them," says Jus Reign.

Jus Reign, who has scores of YouTube videos floating on the net, has also taken digs at Punjabi singers Honey Singh, Miss Pooja and Sartaj. “All in good spirit mate,” he clarifies.

Jokes apart, his videos are not fluff and only aimed at mocking people, but each work is an outcome of an experience and has a message. For example, the one on desi parents really served as a mirror to me and I advise all parents to teenagers to watch it. Better than going to a counsellor, believe you me. Perhaps the realism in his comedy is the reason Jus Reign reigns supreme on YouTube. Maybe he should do one on desi children.

This week, I was in Ludhiana signing my new book, Maharaja in Denims. Nothing unusual for an author to do, but the amazing part was that the signing event was organised by two youngsters, Raman Pahwa and Harjinder Kukreja, whom I had never met before. Raman and Harjinder organised the event out of sheer passion for the column, Punjabi by Nature, and marathoner Fauja Singh, whose biography I wrote in 2011. A thank you to all the readers who have believed in this column.