Language trouble: Don’t know Punjabi? NRI police may put you at unease | chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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Language trouble: Don’t know Punjabi? NRI police may put you at unease

Residents wishing to register a complaint with the NRI police station, but not well-versed with Punjabi may be caught in a fix in SAS Nagar. Such was the experience of a Panchkula resident, who on approaching the police for redressal of his NRI sister’s grievance with a complaint written in English, was asked to return with one in Punjabi, in an apparent move to delay the case’s proceedings.

chandigarh Updated: Jan 04, 2015 12:54 IST

Residents wishing to register a complaint with the NRI police station, but not well-versed with Punjabi may be caught in a fix in SAS Nagar.

Such was the experience of a Panchkula resident, who on approaching the police for redressal of his NRI sister’s grievance with a complaint written in English, was asked to return with one in Punjabi, in an apparent move to delay the case’s proceedings.

Aruna Anand, a resident of Canada, said on February 6, 2014, she lodged a complaint with the NRI police station through email (complaint number 20140729). As she was in Canada at the time, she asked her brother, Ashish Mittal, a resident of Sector 10 in Panchkula, to pursue the complaint.

Mittal said the police summoned both the parties of the case several times between February and June 2014. However, it failed to settle the property dispute that they had with a property dealer.

He added that in June 2014, an assistant sub-inspector (ASI), who was dealing with the case, asked him to lodge a fresh complaint. But when he submitted the complaint in English, he was asked to submit a fresh one in Punjabi.

Mittal said after the ASI’s directions, he went to the local court for translation of the complaint, and handed over a fresh letter to the cop.

However, much to Mittal’s dismay, the NRI police on July 28, 2014, informed him that they had closed the case as it was ‘civil’ in nature, and police intervention was not made out.

When contacted, Kamaljeet Singh, assistant inspector general (AIG) of NRI wing, said most complaints at the wing were received in English through email or by hand, and they had never faced any problem. However, he feigned ignorance of Mittal’s case.

The complaint

Aruna Anand had purchased a 500 square yards plot through a local property dealer for Rs 60 lakh in July 2011. As per her allegations, the dealer assured her that the plot would be allotted within two years. However, when no one contacted her for over two years, she approached the property dealer’s office, only to be told that they would allot her two plots, one sized 200 square yards and another 227 square yards.

She alleged that the dealer had charged her for a 500 square yards plot, but had failed to keep his part of the deal.