Primary hyperparathyroidism affecting Indians at younger age: Study | chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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Primary hyperparathyroidism affecting Indians at younger age: Study

Primary hyperparathyroidism is a disorder of one or more of the parathyroid glands – endocrine glands, which regulate the amount of calcium in blood and bones. The glands become overactive and secrete excess amounts of hormone (PTH), resulting in higher blood calcium level than normal, which can cause a variety of health problems. 

chandigarh Updated: Apr 05, 2017 13:51 IST
Tanbir Dhaliwal

Primary hyperparathyroidism is affecting Indians at a younger age (from 14 to 41 years) when compared with their Western counterparts, a study conducted by experts belonging to a consortium of hospitals, including the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), has revealed.

Primary hyperparathyroidism is a disorder of one or more of the parathyroid glands – endocrine glands, which regulate the amount of calcium in blood and bones. The glands become overactive and secrete excess amounts of hormone (PTH), resulting in higher blood calcium level than normal, which can cause a variety of health problems. 

Surgery is the common treatment for primary hyperparathyroidism. 

The study “Primary hyperparathyroidism: Insights from the Indian PHPT registry” has been published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism. It has been conducted by experts from the endocrinology department, PGIMER, IPGMER Kolkata, AIIMS New Delhi, Fortis Hospital Jaipur and Vijaya Hospital/MMM Hospital Chennai. 

The study explored data submitted to the Indian PHPT (primary hyperparathyroidism) registry between July 2005 and June 2015 from five centres covering four different geographical regions. The clinical, biochemical, radiological and histopathological characteristics of PHPT patients across India were analysed for similarity and variability across the centres. 

A total of 464 people (137 men and 327 women) suffering from PHPT were analysed. Majority (95%) of the patients displayed PHPT symptoms. Common symptoms were weakness and fatigue (58.7%), bone pain (56%), renal stone disease (31%), pancreatitis (12.3%) and gallstone disease (11%). 

About the procedures to localise parathyroid adenoma (benign tumor of parathyroid gland) the study said, “Sestamibi scanning had better sensitivity than ultrasonography in the localisation of parathyroid adenoma. However, when these two modalities were combined, 93% of the cases were correctly localised.”

The study concluded that the majority of PHPT patients within India are still mainly symptomatic with >50% of patients presenting with bone disease and one-third with renal impairment. 

“Compared to the Western countries, Indian patients with PHPT are younger, biochemical abnormalities are more severe, and adenoma (benign tumour) weight is higher,” it states. 

“As our observation is largely derived from a tertiary care hospital, the results do not reflect racial differences in susceptibility to PHPT,” it states.