Right foot forward | chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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Right foot forward

While reality shows these days are known for constant cat fights and ill-tempered judges who don’t think twice before lashing out, choreographer and judge of popular dance reality show Nach Baliye, Terence Lewis believes that television is not a medium for bringing someone down so publicly.

chandigarh Updated: Feb 16, 2014 11:31 IST
Nanki Singh

While reality shows these days are known for constant cat fights and ill-tempered judges who don't think twice before lashing out, choreographer and judge of popular dance reality show Nach Baliye, Terence Lewis believes that television is not a medium for bringing someone down so publicly. "Participants need to be encouraged; as judges, we need to use our powers wisely," says Terence, in Chandigarh on Friday.


Though the show has been dogged by controversies, with contestants having claimed it has been fixed, Terence believes it's all a case of sour grapes. "Someone is a winner and the other person's a loser; that's just how it is," says he.

Having recently worked on the Sanjay Leela Bhansali film, Goliyon Ki Raseela Ram-Leela, Terence is known for his dislike of Bollywood. "Even for Ram-Leela, I went on the set for just one day, the rest was all executed by my assistants," says he and adds that the demand for contemporary dance is practically nil in the industry and the atmosphere of films is very limiting.

Terence is known for having choreographed the Ram Gopal Varma directed Naach in 2004. While the film tanked, its actors -- Antara Mali and Abhishek Bachchan -- were hailed for their avant-garde dancing. "That film is very close to my heart; for me it was like writing a story and watch it reach fruition. If I got a film like that again, I would love to work on it," says Terence, nostalgically.

Choreographing someone is knowing when to push them as well as understanding what that person's limitations are, according to him. "You have to make the person comfortable; you start easy and then depending on how well that person is responding, you increase the difficulty level."

It's all about teamwork according to the man. Also, he takes dance very seriously, and has given up teaching people who are in it just for recreational purposes. Now, he teaches only those who are gearing up for competitions. "I am very serious about this and though I am in town to conduct a salsa workshop, it's not all fun and games, as we will be selecting a winner who will get to compete further at dance festivals," concludes Terence.