UT robbed rural land: Report | chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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UT robbed rural land: Report

The UT administration has robbed the gram sabhas of their rural land by way of illegal gratifications and collusions at different levels in governance, observed the Fourth Delhi Finance Commission Report for Chandigarh.

chandigarh Updated: Oct 16, 2014 14:08 IST
Vinod kumar

The UT administration has robbed the gram sabhas of their rural land by way of illegal gratifications and collusions at different levels in governance, observed the Fourth Delhi Finance Commission Report for Chandigarh.

The report, which was submitted to UT administrator Shivraj Patil, has said the policies and practices pursued in Chandigarh were such that these facilitated in the robbing of the gram sabhas of their rural land.

“It appears that the realtors, in active collusion with the rural elite, local politicians and the office of chief administrator, appointed under the Capital of Punjab Development and Regulation Act, 1952, outwitted the oldest administrative institution of the provincial governance operating under the control of the collector, Chandigarh administration by unauthorisedly converting the use of land for purposes other than agriculture and allied activities.”

The report added that some parts of the rural lands that could not be disposed of in urban land market was occupied by rural elite for putting their human shelters over the land lying immediately next to the approved, ‘lal dora’ area.

What is lal dora?

This refers to that part of traditional village land that can be used for non-agricultural purpose only, or for support systems like livestock. This acts as the boundary within which the overarching norms of the local body or development authority do not apply.

The commission has said the administration has a lot to explain on the irregular conversion of rural land.

‘Efforts towards local govt stymied’

The report, while commenting on the matters, affecting the functional ability of village administration institutions, stated the administration has virtually not permitted village and local self-government institutions to work in any meaningful manner during the period, when villages in the UT had vast rural land meant for agriculture.


‘Gram sabhas not notified’

Although in 1993, the administration did establish gram panchayats, it skipped the legal necessity of notifying the gram sabha areas and associated gram sabhas.Even after expiry of 20 years of enforcement of the Punjab Panchayati Raj Act, 1994, the administration does not appear to be serious in granting autonomy to village administration institutions despite recommendations of the First Delhi Finance Commission report.