Woman’s topless act gets hotel manager the stick | chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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Woman’s topless act gets hotel manager the stick

A British woman’s over-the-top dancing, in which she took off her shirt on stage, not only shocked many participants at a private conference of tattoo artists at Hotel Rajhans of Haryana tourism department in Faridabad, but has also led to suspension of the hotel’s general manager. This happens only in India...

chandigarh Updated: Oct 06, 2012 22:28 IST

A British woman’s over-the-top dancing, in which she took off her shirt on stage, not only shocked many participants at a private conference of tattoo artists at Hotel Rajhans of Haryana tourism department in Faridabad, but has also led to suspension of the hotel’s general manager.


According to official information, it was the second consecutive year that private firm Line Art Tattoo had organised an international tattoo conference at the convention centre of the hotel at Surajkund.

A gathering of about 300 participants and guests from different parts of the world was present when the woman, aged about 30, took off her top as she got onto the state to show off her tattoos. Her dancing made many cringe further, but there was no dearth of spectators who started clicking photos. The organisers, taken by surprise, got the music stopped and asked her to get down.

But it did not end there; action against the GM followed.

Financial commissioner, Haryana tourism, Vijai Vardhan confirmed the action, and said the matter was being looked into by the department as well as the police. The police would be probing if the act constituted an offence under the laws against obscenity.

When contacted, Sabharwal said he regretted that the incident “showed the tourism department in poor light”. He added, though, that the incident was beyond anyone’s control. “Even the organisers had anticipated it,” he said, adding that it could have been an acceptable way of celebration for the British national, but was objectionable for others.