Mumbai has seen 13 rain-related deaths; H1N1, malaria top the list | cities | Hindustan Times
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Mumbai has seen 13 rain-related deaths; H1N1, malaria top the list

Seven of them died of swine flu, two of malaria, three of leptospirosis, and one of hepatitis A and E.

cities Updated: Aug 06, 2017 01:48 IST
Sadaguru Pandit
Seven of the 13 people died of swine flu.
Seven of the 13 people died of swine flu.

As many as 13 people died of various monsoon-related ailments in Mumbai in July. Seven of them died of swine flu, two of malaria, three of leptospirosis, and one of hepatitis A and E. The two malaria deaths were reported from Ghatkopar and Jogeshwari. The death review committee is analysing three more suspected malaria deaths.

“A 26-year-old man from Jogeshwari had textbook malaria symptoms: chills and high fever. He treated himself with medication from a local pharmacy and visited a general practitioner when the fever didn’t subside,” said a health official. When his haemoglobin and platelet levels dropped, he was taken to a medical college where he died within four days of treatment on July 25.

Another 45-year-old woman from Ghatkopar too suffered from chills, body ache and weakness for five days after which she was admitted to a government hospital. She died within two days of treatment.

Swine flu has become another challenge in the state and the city where 413 cases and seven deaths were reported this year compared to one case and no deaths in 2016 in the same period. The two latest cases claimed two women aged 70 and 33 years old.

City also reported probably the first hepatitis death this year in the form of a 25-year-old pregnant woman. Though she received treatment for four days, she died on July 13.

“We have surveyed 350 homes and 1,680 people to check for hepatitis. 716 homes and 3,625 people were surveyed after the H1N1 deaths. said Dr Padmaja Keskar, executive health officer.

2017
  • Mumbai has seen 13 rain-related deaths; H1N1, malaria top the list