Noida: Doctors urge youngsters to quit smoking on World Lung Cancer Day | noida | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Aug 24, 2017-Thursday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Noida: Doctors urge youngsters to quit smoking on World Lung Cancer Day

Doctors said that tobacco is gaining popularity among youngsters and also shattered many myths related to smoking.

noida Updated: Aug 01, 2017 23:09 IST
Vaibhav Jha
A seminar-cum-awareness programme was held at Sharda University. Medical students, teachers and hospital staff campaigned on the ill-effects of smoking.
A seminar-cum-awareness programme was held at Sharda University. Medical students, teachers and hospital staff campaigned on the ill-effects of smoking.

City-based doctors on Tuesday shared their thoughts and gave an insight into tobacco addiction to the younger generation on World Lung Cancer Day.

They said that tobacco is gaining popularity among youngsters and also shattered many myths related to smoking.

“Whether you are smoking regular cigarette/bidis or sheesha/hukka or e-cigarettes/light cigarettes, consumption of tobacco is equally harmful, for all ages and in all forms. Many believe that smoking light cigarettes won’t affect their lungs as much as regular ones. This is a myth,” Dr Vikas Goswami, senior consultant, department of medical oncology, Fortis Hospital, Noida, said.

According to the World Health Organization, tobacco kills more than 7 million people every year. Over 6 million deaths are a result of direct consumption, whereas 890,000 are due to passive smoking.

“Smoking remains one of the highest health risks to Indians, leading to a death toll of almost 1 million people per year and costs us US$16 billion every year as well. The enforcement agencies must adopt a zero-tolerance policy towards violations by the tobacco industry in compliance with tobacco control laws,” said Dr Ravi Mehrotra, director, National Institute for Cancer Prevention and Research, Noida.

Dr Goswami urged youngsters to not fall victim to peer pressures.

“We have noticed a rising trend of smoking among young women, who prefer e-cigarettes and light cigarettes. These are equally harmful as, apart from lung cancer, they increase the risk of other complications such as heart attack,” said Dr Goswami.

“There is another myth that smoking at a young age and then quitting at 30 years of age is a safe practice. The ones who start smoking at a young age find it extremely difficult to break the habit later. They continue to smoke even after 30 and only stop when they realise that they have cancer,” Dr Goswami said.

Dr Anurag Bhargav, chief medical officer of Gautam Budh Nagar, also stressed on the need to quit smoking for the sake of one’s family. “Even passive smoking affects those who are close to smokers. This is a deadly habit that deprives a person of well-being and happiness. Other problems such as impotency are also caused due to smoking,” said Dr Bhargav.

On the occasion, a seminar-cum-awareness programme was held at Sharda University. Medical students, teachers and hospital staff campaigned on the ill-effects of smoking.

“Cancer is not fatal if diagnosed at the right time. However, smoking is a nuisance as it not only affects the lungs of the smoker but also that of the people around,” said Dr Manish Pandey, a cancer specialist.