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HindustanTimes Tue,02 Sep 2014

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Beyond attacking, Imran Khan has no plan

The army must be careful not to extend its dislike of Nawaz Sharif to a full-blown undermining of Pakistan’s constitutional democracy. It should rein Imran Khan in.

Opening the Western Ghats up for a free-for-all jamboree will have consequences

While being enthusiastic about growth and opening up pristine and ecologically sensitive areas for the greater common good is all very good, the truth is that nature has its own ways of responding to excessive pressure as it happened in Uttarakhand in 2013 and Malin recently.
From Sonia Gandhi to Rahul Gandhi down to the Lok Sabha candidate, everyone has been responsible for Congress' dismal performance. As battlefield commanders, the Gandhis ought to share the responsibility, writes Kay Benedict.
India needs not merely a naval programme or even a maritime doctrine but a political plan for what it wants to do with its seas and how it seeks to project its oceanic influence, writes Ashok Malik.
The dowry harassment law has been grossly misused. The Centre must act to make Section 498A of the Indian Penal Code bailable, writes Ritwik Bisaria.
Polarisation has translated into communal tensions and violence in UP, while in Bihar there is greater civic engagement between communities, and this has constituted a bulwark against communalism.
There’s no denying that Japanese PM Shinzo Abe genuinely appears to like his Indian counterpart, and the feeling is visibly mutual. But that can only go so far in furthering ties between two robust democracies.
PM Narendra Modi has come to remind me of an old-fashioned headmaster. He reportedly treats his ministers as schoolchildren, telling them what to wear, who to meet, and what to say, writes Mark Tully.
Prime Minister Narendra Modi gave his first expansive interview on foreign policy to Japanese journalists ahead of his visit to Japan on Saturday. HT explains what stands out from this interesting interaction.
Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Japan, starting on Saturday, is significant for a bilateral relationship that has not fulfilled its potential despite the absence of any historical or ongoing negative dimensions, barring the Indian nuclear tests in 1974.
It appears that Modi’s resolve to build closer ties with Japan is to contain China’s power. Modi’s vision for Asia is stable power equilibrium in which India can thrive unhindered, writes Brahma Chellaney.
Richard Attenborough and India coalesce in the life story of Mohandas Gandhi. But the epic success of Gandhi (1982) has obscured from general awareness an earlier association of his with India, writes Gopalkrishna Gandhi.
The recent heckling of Congress chief ministers sharing a stage with the prime minister is unfortunate. However, it is of a piece with a more widespread atmosphere of distrust and suspicion that pervades Indian politics, writes Ramachandra Guha.
Has the BJP taken leave of its senses? In fact, my second question is more pointed: why is Mr Modi silent? So what am I talking about? It's the brazenly communal statements made by senior BJP leaders in UP, writes Karan Thapar.
Astory in The New Yorker magazine by Michael Specter on the acts and claims of Vandana Shiva, the curse of genetically modified organisms, begins as a tribute, proceeds to imply that she is a quack, and finally arrives at what is in the core of some highly influential activists.
It's really tough being a love jihadi. If you're considering it as a career option, I would strongly advise you against it, writes Manas Chakravarty.
The weakest link in the Karthik Gowda case is the woman’s desire to remain married to an alleged rapist. Accusing a man who didn’t marry you as promised or who married you and then dumped you isn't rape, argues Barkha Dutt.
Love jihad propaganda inflames communal passions and leads to hardening stands in an already polarised environment, made more fragile by social media and viral rumours, writes Namita Bhandare.
Politics too, is experiencing a similar compression in time. So, Narendra Modi’s first 100 days are already being seen as a verdict on his government. A 100 days is just over 14 weeks, writes Rajdeep Sardesai.
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