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HindustanTimes Fri,19 Sep 2014

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Independent investigation needed in Jadavpur molestation case

A student is allegedly molested inside a university campus. The normal reaction of any functioning university management would be to conduct an enquiry. The normal reaction of any self-respecting police force would be to investigate the allegation. But neither an enquiry nor an investigation has taken place in the Jadavpur University case.

Foreign investments: India's real work begins now

This $55-billion commitment from Japan and China is just a statement of intent. For these commitments to translate into actual spending on the ground, the government will have to remove several roadblocks that caused the investment cycle to collapse in the first place.
India’s fumbling responses to the increasing Chinese incursions do not bode well for its Himalayan security, writes Brahma Chellaney.
If Modi is serious about attracting more investment to the knowledge-intensive industries (such as the biopharmaceutical sector), his government will need to tackle three obstacles - intellectual property rights, regulatory system, healthcare.
It is a welcome change to see Chinese President Xi Jinping meet Prime Minister Narendra Modi in Ahmedabad, as opposed to other heads of states who have avoided Gujarat. China is an economic, military and scientific powerhouse and to become one India needs to learn a lot from China.
In 2010 and 2011, the UPA released lakhs of undertrials as part of the National Mission for Delivery of Justice and Legal Reforms. But for all the hoopla, it failed to make more than a temporary dent in the country’s undertrial population.
Natural calamities are times of great truth, of togetherness, of closing ranks, of forgetting hatred and bitterness. Unfortunately, the J-K floods initially appeared to be enhancing the bitterness between Kashmiris and other Indians, writes Samar Halarnkar.
Ever since Mumbai was besieged by Pakistani agents of terror in 2008, India has been consoling itself with lies. India’s dogmatic adherence to 'uninterruptible dialogue' with Pakistan has yielded only uninterrupted insults, writes Kapil Komireddi.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi would do well to distance India from the US’ exhortations on non-Nato ally status, writes Rajendra Abhyankar.

‘Shinkansen’, or the ‘Bullet’ train, introduced 50 years ago in Japan, has evolved into many avatars — in Europe as TGV (Train à Grande Vitesse) and China as CHR (Chinese Highspeed Rail) — and is now poised to enter India in a big way.

Both sides will, first, be straining to ensure that Xi Jinping's visit in no way pales in comparison to Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s recent visit to Japan. Beijing has already announced that Xi’s visit will see investments worth $100 billion in India.

Natural calamities are times of great truth, of togetherness, of closing ranks, of forgetting hatred and bitterness. Unfortunately, the J-K floods initially appeared to be enhancing the bitterness between Kashmiris and other Indians, writes Samar Halarnkar.
It had to happen. After Narendra Modi demonstrated the considerable power of the social media in the LS polls, politicians priming for a place in the Maharashtra polls have boarded the bandwagon, writes Smruti Koppikar.
I wish the Shiv Sena chief would show more spine in the wake of the bypoll results. Now is the time to shed his politeness and let the BJP know who needs who the more, writes Sujata Anandan.
As this columnist predicted on September 19, 2014, the fatal day when the results of the Scottish independence referendum were announced, this partition of the United Kingdom would lead to ultimate instability and disaster, writes Farrukh Dhondy.
From cleaning roads, drains, toilets and parks, picking construction waste from the streets to removing encroachments and fixing streetlights, road signs and street furniture, Delhi's civic agencies will launch the Clean India Week starting September 25.
 Public cloud is like public transport: you know you can use a bus at a low cost, but you can’t be sure where you will be seated writes N Madhavan.
Staying unplugged from the rest of the world is unimaginable, but the Jammu and Kashmir deluge made the nightmare a reality for many of us. Wonder why staying unplugged leaves us powerless? Because Twitter and Facebook are more addictive than cigarettes and alcohol!
A battle that is underway in the United States is between a self-serving retailer that wants to sell books very cheap and a self-serving publisher that wants the freedom to decide the price of its own books, writes Manu Joseph.
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