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HindustanTimes Mon,14 Jul 2014

Comment

A history of arrogance: getting it wrong in Kashmir again

The authorities in Kashmir rarely miss an opportunity to alienate the people of the Valley. In an appalling incident last week, the Jammu and Kashmir Police stopped a public lecture by historian Mridu Rai.

Weigh words in the balance

In seeking to stress a legal point, judges like those in the Madras High Court should not go overboard.
The direction in this budget is no different from that of the previous government — one that basked in bureaucratic banality over efficient delivery. Partha Mukhopadhyay  writes
Arun Jaitley, who is handicapped by the interim budget, needs to first get things back to normal. The big-ticket reforms will take more time, NK Singh writes.
When histories are kept secret, not only are valuable lessons lost, they also create an environment when the wrong lessons are imbibed. The Indian military has always kept away from fully using special operations because of several historical reasons that remain buried.
This budget represents Arun Jaitley's pragmatic attempt to administer a life-saving medicine for the economy while ensuring that the pill is sufficiently sugar-coated, writes Rajiv Kumar.
The NDA cannot deliver on its budget promises until it removes performance bottlenecks and elevates us to a new level of execution, writes MS ‘Vindi’ Banga.

The finance minister appears to have made a good beginning, but the road ahead could be long. The real challenge for him and the NDA government will be to come up with a grander vision that does what the previous UPA, writes Rajesh Mahapatra.

The NDA’s budget is commendable, but the worth of any of these initiatives is only as good as the quality of its implementation. Much depends on how much the new political-bureaucratic set-up can deliver. Pulin B Nayak writes

For the business council to achieve its targets a strong partnership between industry and government is crucial.

Never in recent memory has the interplay of the past and the present been thrown up in so prominent a manner as in this World Cup. With Brazil’s astounding defeat at the hands of the Germans, things that happened in 1934, when Brazil lost in a somewhat similar manner, are beginning to be talked about like they took place yesterday.

You live at your own risk in the National Capital Region. That was an advice doled out to us generously when we moved to Indirapuram a few years ago. We thought we had minimised the risk by moving into a gated community. Except for the huge power back-up bills and the intermittent problem of clogged sewers outside the apartment complex, so far we have had few reasons to complain.

As the Brazil World Cup reaches its climax, it has been marked by the quadrennial exercise in dissing the global sport. Among those at the forefront of the affront is author Ann Coulter, who opined in a column: "I promise you: No American whose great-grandfather was born here is watching soccer."
The NDA has got a strong mandate and this was clearly an opportunity for it to do a bit of grand-standing: announce one really big thing or two and, in return, reap the benefits of making it a memorable budget, writes HT editor-in-chief Sanjoy Narayan.
A sugar rush could be all you need to beat jet lag. Now here’s scientific evidence that donuts and other insulin-spiking foods have some use other than making you overweight and at risk of diabetes.
Total sanitation is not just a toilet in every home, but also soap and toilet paper. In a masterstroke, the move dovetails into the increase in the free baggage allowance, allowing travellers to get even more soaps into the country, writes Manas Chakravarty.
Without the Leader of the Opposition post, our democracy would be incomplete and diminished. This is, therefore, an issue that also touches upon the bigger and more important morality of our politics, writes Karan Thapar.
An estimated 21 million people, expatriate Indians or people of Indian origins, remit more than $70 billion to India every year, and that’s nearly a quarter of the nation’s foreign exchange reserves.
Removal of all subsidies won't ignite inflation. Only diesel hike will do so. And all this can be compensated by lowering income taxes as detailed above without creating any strain on the government's budget.
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