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HindustanTimes Fri,29 Aug 2014
Sunday Letters
Hindustan Times
April 27, 2013
First Published: 21:15 IST(27/4/2013)
Last Updated: 21:25 IST(27/4/2013)

Time to look forward, not backward

Manas Chakravarty in Back-to-back model (Loose Canon, April 21) points out the ongoing race among states to show themselves as the most-backward in order to secure grants.


Nitish Kumar has been the chief minister of Bihar for the last eight years and by asking for grants in the name of backwardness, he is highlighting his own failure to do anything on the development front. It is an irony that the allocation of grants from the Centre in the name of backwardness is becoming a weapon for winning and wooing political partners.

In fact, an independent agency should be constituted for the allocation of special grants and only on its recommendations should funds be disbursed. Preference should be given to states who have done better with the allocated grant and not to those who use the paucity of funds as an excuse to cover up their own inadequacies.

Rakesh Sherawat, via email

Nitish’s old whine in new bottles

The article Objections? Speak up now (Chanakya, April 21) makes a strong point about Bihar chief minister Nitish Kumar, the Left and the Trinamool Congress’ politics of tactical outrage.

The Left, acting holier than thou, decides to become moral when it suits them. They employ moral relativism in changing their stance and use the anti-imperial card just to make themselves look clean. Though Nitish has brought development to Bihar, he is a regional player who is using an old tactic that lacks originality.

Calling Gujarat chief minister Narendra Modi communal will not benefit his image as a secular person. In fact, he is not inherently secular but has decided to become so with an eye to the Muslim votebank.

Ashish Rai, via email

II

The argument in Chanakya rightly showcases the real cause of policy paralysis in India. A fractured verdict in the 2014 elections can create instability as is being seen now during the nine-year rule of the UPA where regional politics is dominating the political landscape and policy formulations of the government.

From Mayawati to Mulayam Singh Yadav, not to mention Mamata Banerjee, the politics of arm-twisting has taken precedence in the decision-making process.

Sanjeev Jaggi, via email

Not through a lens darkly

Karan Thapar’s view in Case by case basis (Sunday Sentiments, April 21) about the Supreme Court’s refusal to grant a temporary stay in sending actor Sanjay Dutt to jail reflects a lack of understanding of film-making. Producers can lose large sums of money if shooting schedules are cancelled.

This was bound to happen if Dutt had been sent to jail on April 18. The four-week grace period during which Dutt can shoot for his films will benefit many. The court having given a similar grace period to other convicts is not guilty of bias.

V Gangadhar, via email

To speak or not to speak

With reference to Zia Haq’s article Sparring soldiers (April 21), the comparison of Congress spokespersons with the BJP’s is a non-issue. The problem is the more one speaks more are the chances for the media to draw inferences from their observations. That is what is happening with leaders like Manish Tewari and Shakeel Ahmad in comparison to Smriti Irani, Shaina NC and others.

Gautam Chandra, via email

Don’t make light of quality here

Charu Sudan Kasturi’s article Learning curve (The Big Story, April 21) provides a status check after three years of implementation of the Right to Education Act. The ‘no detention’ approach has made both students and teachers take their roles more lightly. The question is who will ensure that a certain quality of teaching is maintained.

Ahrar Husain, via email


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