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HindustanTimes Wed,01 Oct 2014
Sunday letters
None
May 05, 2012
First Published: 22:09 IST(5/5/2012)
Last Updated: 22:12 IST(5/5/2012)

Sachin is too busy for House work
Congratulations to Vishwajyoti Ghosh for his fantastic cartoon Full Toss (April 20) on the Congress' decision to nominate Sachin Tendulkar to the Rajya Sabha. It's doubtful if Tendulkar will be able to attend any session of Parliament due to his various commitments on and off the field. However, it would be great if he brings to Parliament's attention the various problems that plague sports in India.
Ketan R Meher, Mumbai

II
This refers to Manas Chakravarty's article Aila, Rajya Sabha (Loose Canon, April 29). Nominating celebrities to Rajya Sabha just because they are famous undermines the sanctity of the House. It would be better if retired entrepreneurs like Narayan Murthy are nominated to Parliament. With their experience and wisdom, they will be able to contribute towards nation-building more than sportsmen or artists.
Sudhakar Shenoy, Mumbai

UPA's like a car with flat tyres
This refers to the article Let's talk Reforms 2.0 (Chanakya, April 29). It's wrong to blame the global meltdo-wn for the present economic mess in India, which is largely due to the UPA's inability to formulate policies and poor planning. The UPA can't use the 'compulsions of coalition politics' to justify its poor track record. All economic problems can be kept in check if the Centre revises its tax structure, punishes those who don't pay taxes and recovers all the taxpayers' money that has been lost in various scams.
BM Singh, via email

II
Chanakya presents a balanced and informative analysis on 'policy paralysis' in India. The UPA can be described as a car which is running on a powerless engine and flat tyres. It is neither taking any new positive decisions nor rectifying its past mistakes. If the Congress-led central government can't bring about at least three major reforms in the next two years, it can't hope to win the 2014 general elections.
Sharda Bhargav, Jalandhar

So many opportunities lost
This refers to Harinder Baweja's article The case against Sajjan (360 Degree, April 29). Congress leader Sajjan Kumar, against whom there's sufficient evidence of instigating a mob to massacre hundreds of

Sikhs and destroying property worth crores in 1984, has not been brought to justice even after 28 years. It's high time that the Congress stopped shielding Kumar and let the law take its course.
Ashish Rai, via email

II
It's wrong to blame the successive governments for the 1984 riots when the Sikhs have never stood united as a community against the perpetrators of the massacre. The four major Sikh groups could have demanded justice and rehabilitation on behalf of the riot victims' families. But they haven't done so in the past three decades. In fact, the Akal Takht jathedars have never spoken their mind against the riot or the rioters. Instead, they have been passing the buck to the Congress.
Deepjot Thukral, Ambala

Not calling a spade a spade
This refers to Karan Thapar's article A rare precision (Sunday Sentiments, April 29). If Thapar believes that people and the media should stay out of Abhishek Manu Singhvi's "personal" life, then he could have avoided writing on the issue. Going ga-ga over Singhvi or appreciating him for being nice to the writer does not absolve the Congress leader.
Kala, via email

Being on the same page
Indrajit Hazra's article Outside of a dog (Read, April 28) presents a good argument in the favour of readers and reading. Today, writers and writings are celebrated so much that rarely does anyone pay attention to the relationship between writing and reading. It's interesting to note that while everyone talks about the difficulties of cultivating a writing style, only a few people like Hazra realise that it's equally tough to develop a 'reading taste'.
Rupabh Shukla, Delhi

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