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HindustanTimes Fri,28 Nov 2014
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Hindustan Times
New Delhi, January 05, 2011
First Published: 22:27 IST(5/1/2011)
Last Updated: 22:34 IST(5/1/2011)

This chilly season, turn up the heat on spreading the warmth
The report It’s unhappy new year for Delhi's homeless (January 3) not only highlights the increasing disparity between the haves and have-nots in Delhi, but also touches on the need for civic authorities to take an action to reduce this gap. The officials concerned should make use of the unused public buildings in and around the capital to house the homeless at least in the winter season. The expense for this could be borne by both the taxpayers and authorities. This is the least people can do to spread the warmth.
Rijul Kochhar, Delhi

How to make the bill work
With reference to the editorial Truth will set all of us free (Our Take, January 4), every Indian should be covered by the proposed Lokpal bill, which should be free from loopholes. Apart from empowering people to question netas and babus, it should also strengthen our investigative agencies, which often fall prey to pressure from powerful public officials.
MC Joshi, Lucknow

II
There is no doubt that bills like the proposed Lokpal bill will go a long way towards rooting out corruption and establishing an equitable society. But passing legislations alone won’t bring about desired changes. Both the CBI and the CVC should come under the Lokpal. This will ensure that the Lokpal works independently and, if need be, the Prime Minister can also be questioned.
Harish K Monga, Ferozepur

To CBI or not to be
The CBI seems to be in a rush to close the Bofors case on account of lack of evidence (Tribunal revives ghost of Bofors, January 4). It recently closed the Aarushi murder case on similar grounds. It’s understandable that pressure from the Congress-led government at the Centre, which fears that the re-opening of the case will taint former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi's reputation, will force the CBI to give up on the Bofors case. But investigations into the Aarushi case won’t harm anyone's honour. The CBI has lost its credibility. India doesn’t need an investigating agency that can be manipulated by politicians.
Devendra Narain, via email

II
Both the UP police and the CBI have let people down with their inability to solve the Aarushi murder case (Can’t find motive for Aarushi murder: CBI, January 2). It was only after Aarushi’s parents expressed their displeasure at the CBI’s inaction that the investigative agency named the deceased's father, Rajesh Talwar, as the chief suspect. This is tragic. Instead of making baseless allegations against Talwar, the CBI should nab the real culprit. It should do its duty and stop harassing the Talwar family.
Ranjana Manchanda, via email

The capital has aged badly
Khushwant Singh's article Growing up with New Delhi (Centenary of the capital, January 1) brought back memories of Delhi to this 95-year-old, who saw the British building various parts of the city. Back then Connaught Place (CP) was a jungle where tall reeds grew and jackals howled at night. It was built in 1925 and children played on CP's wide roads. Today, it is disappointing to see that the beautiful city has become one of the most misgoverned, overcrowded and polluted cities in the world.
Mahindar Singh, Delhi

The ball’s in the media’s court
In his article News we can use (Beyond The Bite, December 31), Rajdeep Sardesai does a good job of defining the media's role. Journalists should realise that honesty and sincerity are important virtues in their line of work. The media can't afford to lose people’s confidence, as it will cause irreversible damage to the country.
Poornima Narang, via email


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