Absence of Decision Review System stumps New Zealand | cricket | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
May 23, 2017-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Absence of Decision Review System stumps New Zealand

Brendon McCullum’s dismissal hurt the Kiwis. McCullum, who was parrying the Indians well, got an inside edge but was still given out leg before to Umesh Yadav, and walked away disappointed.

cricket Updated: Aug 27, 2012 00:35 IST
Khurram Habib

Brendon McCullum’s dismissal hurt the Kiwis. McCullum, who was parrying the Indians well, got an inside edge but was still given out leg before to Umesh Yadav, and walked away disappointed.

His skipper, himself a victim of a debatable call earlier, however was diplomatic after the match. Though at least three-four decisions could have been contested, no DRS meant the Kiwis had no option.

“I guess it is like this in this part of the world. It is different rules in different parts of the world,” said Ross Taylor, disappointment writ large on the face. Probed further about the system not being there in the series, he said, “Ask Dhoni.”

Affordable, yet...
The answer gives a hint on how much Dhoni’s opinion matters in this regard. India are the only country not using it among those who can afford to install the system.

A New Zealander present there was agitated by the decision. “How is it possible that I could see the (McCullum’s) edge despite standing behind and the man in front (the umpire) couldn’t see such a thick edge. And why couldn’t it be contested. It beats me.” McCullum’s was not the only decision. Martin Guptill, who was dismissed on Saturday morning, was also unhappy as he was way forward while padding the ball.

Two of the catches in the first innings, of Taylor (by Virat Kohli) and Jeetan Patel (Ravichandran Ashwin), could have gone to the Kiwis. In both the cases, the doubt was whether the ball had touched the ground before being cupped.

Benefit of doubt
In Taylor’s case, the replays were inconclusive as Virat’s foot blocked the best position. In such cases, the benefit of doubt goes to the batsmen. However, the third umpire gave it to the fielding side.

The debate on the use of DRS has been on for a long time. It assumed ugly proportions last year during India’s tour of England when Ravi Shastri lashed out at Nasser Hussain’s criticism of India’s stand.

Hussain later took on Shastri in the commentary box and it turned into a heated argument.