Akram will teach Indian youngsters how to appeal and bowl | cricket | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Apr 26, 2017-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Akram will teach Indian youngsters how to appeal and bowl

Former fast bowler Wasim Akram, who made appealing a fine art during his playing days to win marginal decisions, now wants to teach how to appeal convincingly to young Indian fast bowlers.

cricket Updated: Jul 27, 2009 19:20 IST

Former fast bowler Wasim Akram, who made appealing a fine art during his playing days to win marginal decisions, now wants to teach how to appeal convincingly to young Indian fast bowlers.

Akram has been roped in by city-based Gatorade Centre for Pace Excellence (GCPE) as the chief coach for bowling variation and strategy.

"I will teach them how to appeal. That is also an art that keeps the umpires under pressure in a legal way," Akram said in New Delhi on Monday.

Akram went on to add that his primary role will be to teach the kids how to identify a batsman's weaknesses, especially when they are bowling on the flat, sub-continental pitches.

"I'll also tell them how to bowl according to a set field and how to swing the new ball and get the best out of the old ball, which the westerners call reverse swing. Besides, how to break a partnership. And how to contain when situation so demands will also be discussed," he added.

The 43-year-old former left-arm pacer said that he will teach the young bowlers how to develop their muscles.

"This is their growing phase and this is the right time to build muscles and strengthen their bones. Injuries will be a part and parcel of a fast bowler's life, you can't stop it. But if you have strong muscles you can cut down on the number of injuries," he said.

Along with Akram, GCPE appointed TA Sekar as the Chief Technical Consultant and Ramji Srinivasan as the Chief Advisor, Sports Fitness.

Nine trainees will be groomed by Akram at Modern School, Vasant Vihar. He will come back again in October to re-asses their progress.

Asked whether he would like to be a full-time coach, Akram said: "Full-time coaching is not my cup of tea. I don't have the patience it requires. I can just help them and this is the only way I can give back something to the game."