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Catch riddle

If tim McIntosh is spoken about in India over the next few days it will be because his wicket was the one that took Zaheer Khan to 200 scalps. But there was also a serious danger of the dismissal being remembered for all the wrong reasons, with the New Zealand team appearing to suggest that they did not believe Sachin Tendulkar had taken the catch cleanly at first slip. Anand Vasu reports.

cricket Updated: Jan 15, 2013 12:07 IST
Anand Vasu

If tim McIntosh is spoken about in India over the next few days it will be because his wicket was the one that took Zaheer Khan to 200 scalps.

But there was also a serious danger of the dismissal being remembered for all the wrong reasons, with the New Zealand team appearing to suggest that they did not believe Sachin Tendulkar had taken the catch cleanly at first slip.

The ball flew low and quick off the edge in question and Tendulkar showed remarkable agility and presence of mind in tumbling forward and plucking the ball out of the air before spontaneously throwing the ball up in celebration.

McIntosh, not convinced, stood his ground even as Tendulkar rushed off the ground to get treatment for a bleeding left index finger that was jammed against the ground in the act of taking the catch.

Umpires Simon Taufel and Ian Gould briefly conferred and deemed that the catch was clean. Television replays planted seeds of doubt over whether the ball had touched the ground before reaching Tendulkar's hands, something that was put to the little master at the end of the day's play.

“I was 100 per cent confident that I had taken the catch,” Tendulkar stated emphatically.

“I have seen the replays, and I have also seen my fingers under the ball. If the umpires were in doubt, they would have definitely called for the third umpire. Sometimes, on camera, it looks different. But I was pretty much confident otherwise, I wouldn't have appealed.”

New Zealand coach Andy Moles, however, did not quite see it that way. “You all saw the TV shots and yes, we'd be disappointed, but it's part of the game unfortunately,” Moles said. “Tim is trying to make his way in the game and he's desperately disappointed. But when you're not good enough, things don't seem to go for you.”

Earlier in the day, Mahendra Singh Dhoni was ruled not out after consultation with the TV umpire when Jesse Ryder had attempted to take a low catch at point.

“Moles was surprised that one incident was referred while the other wasn't. “It would be fair to say we were surprised that it wasn't referred,” said Moles.

“The guys (umpires) thought they saw it as they did and made a decision based on what they'd seen between them. It's disappointing, but we've to get on with the game.”