Gilchrist bemoans lop-sided Kotla contest | cricket | Hindustan Times
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Gilchrist bemoans lop-sided Kotla contest

The Delhi Daredevils finally pulled off an impressive win at home on Saturday, after getting their wish of facing the Kings XI Punjab on a green pitch — away from the lifeless, slow surface that their pace-oriented bowling and stroke-making batsmen despised. And the packed Ferozshah Kotla crowd loved the big-hitting contest.

cricket Updated: Apr 24, 2011 23:52 IST
HT Correspondent

The Delhi Daredevils finally pulled off an impressive win at home on Saturday, after getting their wish of facing the Kings XI Punjab on a green pitch — away from the lifeless, slow surface that their pace-oriented bowling and stroke-making batsmen despised. And the packed Ferozshah Kotla crowd loved the big-hitting contest.

The pitch did afford mild seam movement early on but it was the brute domination of batting that came to the fore.

Daredevils' openers, Virender Sehwag and David Warner, hit identical 77s to settle the issue.

Although Shaun Marsh hammered a 95 in Kings XI's chase, skipper Adam Gilchrist, a fearsome bat himself, felt the hard pitch on the fringe of the square meant the boundary was short on one side, leaving the bowlers at a disadvantage.

“It was a lovely batting wicket, and such a short boundary does turn the game a little into a six-hitting competition,” said Gilchrist, when asked to put into perspective a match that witnessed 23 sixes.

Although the Daredevils amassed 231 and Kings XI responded with 202, Gilchrist bemoaned the lopsided contest.

“You do lose an element of skill. You wouldn't want that to be the par score in IPL matches.”

The Daredevils could stick to the pitch for Tuesday's clash against the Royal Challengers Bangalore that could again see a flurry of big hits.

Chetan Chauhan, vice-president of the Delhi & District Cricket Association, said the trick was not to bowl the spinners from the end that allows batsmen to swing over midwicket on the shorter side.