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I was a victim of politics: Shane Bond

Former New Zealand pacer Shane Bond has said that he became a "victim of politics" after joining the Indian Cricket League (ICL) but he has no regret about playing in the 'rebel' twenty20 event which cost him his international career.

cricket Updated: Oct 27, 2010 13:36 IST

Former New Zealand pacer Shane Bond has said that he became a "victim of politics" after joining the Indian Cricket League (ICL) but he has no regret about playing in the 'rebel' twenty20 event which cost him his international career.

At the peak of his career, Bond had joined the ICL and was soon discarded by New Zealand cricket board (NZC).

In his autobiography, 'Looking back', Bond claimed NZC had contractually allowed him to participate in the league but backed out when the ICC intervened. "What I'll never understand is why it had to be one or the other, ICL or playing for New Zealand, especially when I received a cast-iron assurance that I could do both, and my contract with New Zealand Cricket certainly allowed for it," Bond said in his book.

"In the end I became a victim of politics. As distasteful as that might be, I could learn to live with that, but what I can't live with is the suggestion that in the end I didn't want to play for my country," he added.

Bond was not considered for selection for nearly two years after he joined the ICL team 'Delhi Giants' in January 2008.

But after BCCI granted amnesty to the rebel players, Bond also terminated his ICL contract to be back in the national fold.

He then signed up with IPL franchise Kolkata Knight Riders, who bid $750,000 for him at the auction but Bond says he doesn't regret playing in the ICL. "One thing I'll never regret is signing to play in the Indian Cricket League. Not at all. I've achieved security for my family and in the long term that is more important than a few Test and one-day caps.

"Although I had been on a good contract by New Zealand standards, I hadn't got rich out of the game. I'd done all right, obviously, but I simply hadn't played long enough to accumulate the sort of income that would provide long-term security for my family once my career ended."