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'In 90s, Tests and WC ties were routinely fixed'

Paul Condon, the former head of the International Cricket Council's anti-corruption unit, has blown the myth that match fixing is prevalent only in the sub-continent. Condon claims

cricket Updated: Nov 17, 2011 01:50 IST

Paul Condon, the former head of the International Cricket Council's anti-corruption unit, has blown the myth that match fixing is prevalent only in the sub-continent.

In an interview with the London Evening Standard, Condon said: "In the late 1990s, Test and World Cup matches were being routinely fixed."

"There were a number of teams involved in fixing, and certainly more than the Indian sub-continent teams were involved.

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"Every international team, at some stage, had someone doing some funny stuff."

Condon said the root of the problem lay not in Asia but in English county cricket. "It started with friendly fixes in the UK in the old Sunday leagues," he says.

"Over a weekend you'd have a county side playing their match and then a Sunday league match and there would be friendly fixes, not for money but for manipulating places in the leagues. If you're Team A and have a higher position in the Sunday league and I'm captain of Team B and my team have no chance in the Sunday league, I might do a deal to ensure you got maximum points in your Sunday league match. You would reciprocate in the County Championships. These friendly fixes quickly became more sinister, probably in the 80s."

T20 the trigger
In another interview to The Cricketer, Condon attributes the re-emergence of corruption to Twenty20 cricket.

"Probably the greatest trigger point was the explosion of T20. The 'anything goes' party atmosphere allowed some really bad people back into the game. Some of the notorious fixers from early years started to re-emerge on the circuit in India, Pakistan, South Africa, Australia and the UK."

He revealed that over the past 10 years up to six national teams have been subject to attention from the authorities.

"Since 2000 there have been probably five or six national teams who at some stage have been causing concern and have been closely monitored and scrutinised. In terms of frequency, probably Pakistan has been the most challenging in recent years."

2000 match-fixing probe gathers steam
New Delhi: Taking a leaf out of the swiftness with which London's Metropolitan Police cracked the 2010 spot-fixing case involving three Pakistani cricketers, the Delhi Police is now geared up to solve the 2000 match-fixing case in the next 4-5 months.

The Delhi Police this month received a reply from the British authorities to a 2007 "letter rogatory" that sought details of alleged bookie and London-based businessman Sanjeev Chawla, the key accused in the case.

The reply comes as a relief for Delhi Police, which was struggling to piece together a chargesheet 11 years after blowing the lid off the match-fixing. "The probe is on and the chargesheet is yet to be filed. We are hopeful of completing the investigation in four-five few months," said Deputy Commissioner of Police Ashok Chand.