Inappropriate approach: ICC's anti-corruption unit caught napping again | cricket | Hindustan Times
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Inappropriate approach: ICC's anti-corruption unit caught napping again

It is reliably learnt that this particular incident concerning the Mumbai Ranji trophy player who plays for RR, came into light out of an aggrieved member of the ACSU who apparently wanted to expose the laxity in their approach. That member, though, is not with the ACSU anymore.

cricket Updated: Apr 11, 2015 01:02 IST

Following the report of an inappropriate approach made to a Rajasthan Royals player, the BCCI was quick to acknowledge the approach and in the same breath applaud the player concerned, and without fail congratulate the Anti-Corruption Security Unit's players' education programme as well.

But what still demands attention is the role of Anti-Corruption Security Unit (ACSU) and its functioning. It is reliably learnt that this particular incident concerning the Mumbai Ranji trophy player who plays for RR, came into light out of an aggrieved member of the ACSU who apparently wanted to expose the laxity in their approach. That member, though, is not with the ACSU anymore.

That brings the role of ACSU to question: why the ACSU didn't immediately start investigation and subsequently disclose the approach?

It is not for the first time that the ACSU has failed to act on a lead. Every single incident on spot-fixing, match-fixing and approaches have been either reported by the media or the police.

A TV channel did an exposé first and later the Delhi police on its own initiated the 2013 investigation.

Following the 2013 scandal an ACSU official is attached to every team and he mans the team hotel reception area and the floor where players stay round the clock. Yet their delayed response raises questions.

This incident was a one-on-one approach which could have been dealt with immediately. And, if at all an investigation was underway then what stopped the ACSU from reporting the matter to the BCCI and take action against the player.

No committee formed

As of now the BCCI does not have an anti-corruption and security committee. The committee constituted in September 2013 with Amitabh Chaudhary, the Jharkhand State Cricket Association president, an IPS officer, as its chairman has been dissolved and it is unlikely a replacement would be named soon.

"The BCCI release says it is on hold, but we may not constitute the committee. We don't see the need for it," a BCCI official said. "(Ravi) Sawani (head of ACSU) will submit his report to the BCCI president. He is only answerable to the president, who will then decide what is to be done with the report."

The intent to curb the menace of fixing is missing. Soon after the IPL fixing scam, former law minister Kapil Sibal had held talks with former sports minister Jitendra Singh to finalise a new legislation that would have allowed the government to clamp down on match-fixing in sports. But things have not moved since.