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Lights, dance and now comes the real action

The Champions League Twenty20 opening ceremony was scheduled at 7 and the DJ at the stadium had just started using the pressure horn. But soon, the crowd noise was so high that he preferred belting out chartbusters knowing the crowd was already in the mood to party, reports Bivabasu Kumar.

cricket Updated: Oct 09, 2009 02:24 IST
Bivabasu Kumar

The crowd had started gathering at the Chinnaswamy Stadium as early as 5pm. The Champions League Twenty20 opening ceremony was scheduled at 7 and the DJ at the stadium had just started using the pressure horn. But soon, the crowd noise was so high that he preferred belting out chartbusters knowing the crowd was already in the mood to party.

At the stroke of 7, the lights went out and the flashbulbs lit up the ground. The red and blue rays jazzed up the playing arena and out came the captains of the 12 teams in front of the 50,000-odd crowd.

The ceremony began with the captains casting hand impressions as tournament memorabilia.

While local hero and Royal Challengers skipper Anil Kumble and Delhi Daredevils captain Gautam Gambhir got standing ovations, the crowd erupted when Deccan Chargers' Adam Gilchrist took the stage.

What followed next was simply a scintillating visual treat — laser show, dancers wrapped in long silks unfurling into flags of the competing teams, acrobatic cube artistes and so on.

Soon after performers dressed in lavish costumes gyrated to the beats of the Japanese drummers, the buzz in the stands came to a standstill with China's Shaolin monks taking centrestage.

A roaring round of applause greeted the martial artistes who were accompanied by Kerala's Kalaripayattu performers. From synchronising various combat moves, staging mock fights to lying on spearheads, the Shaolin artistes captivated the sellout crowd with their breathtaking performance.

But the real showstopper was none other than Jamaican-American reggae singer Shaggy. The hip-hop singer got the capacity crowd on their feet with his popular number Feel the Rush.

A series of fireworks lit up the sky above the 300 odd dancers and performers in the stadium. And as the 30-minute opening ceremony drew to a close, the Japanese drummers pounded out the beats with Shaggy, Grammy award winner Chaka Khan and British pop singer Jamelia taking the stage for the final act together.

And even before, the euphoria of the spectacular show could die down, it was time for the toss. With the crowd chanting 'Bangalore, Bangalore', it was over to the cricket.