Live grass for pacers to exploit on first day: MCG curator | cricket | Hindustan Times
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Live grass for pacers to exploit on first day: MCG curator

Tony Ware, the curator of the MCG wicket insists that there would be live grass for the bowlers to exploit on Day 1 of the First Test.

cricket Updated: Dec 24, 2007 13:43 IST

The MCG pitch, under cover for the last few days, could have live grass for batsmen to contend with, especially on the first day of the upcoming India-Australia Test, curator Tony Ware said.

"Because the pitch has been under cover for so long, the theory is that the grass will have a green tinge. Obviously, if it sits under the covers for three days, it will green up," Ware said.

It has been raining in Melbourne for the last three days and even today there were a few showers before the gloom gave way to bright sunshine later in the afternoon.

The forecast for Christmas as well as the opening day of the Test on Wednesday is for bright sunshine.

However, the curator said it will not be a pure green top and it was just a part of the pitch-making process to keep some grass before the match.

"We are hoping that with heavy rolling and a sunny day, the pitch could lose that greenness. From our side, we haven't put as much grass on it as in previous Tests.

"We usually thin out the grass leading into the match but it's always better to have more grass than less at this stage of preparation," Ware added.

He also said spinners were sure to have a role in the match towards the end.

"It usually spins a bit later in the match and that's what I think you'll get. It seems everyone is keen to play for quick bowlers but our pitches tend to take spin later in the match.

"Australia may think that India is underdone and may be keen to have a dip at them first up. That is another factor besides the actual state of the pitch," he felt.

"However we always try to prepare a pitch so that when a captain wins the toss, he thinks for a moment and then decides to bat," Ware added.