Morgan all for change, but not game for timeless terms | cricket | Hindustan Times
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Morgan all for change, but not game for timeless terms

Former ICC president David Morgan is game for changing the constitution of cricket's governing body to do away with the rotation policy for appointing its president, provided the "best man for the job is selected".

cricket Updated: Jun 26, 2011 23:44 IST

Former ICC president David Morgan is game for changing the constitution of cricket's governing body to do away with the rotation policy for appointing its president, provided the "best man for the job is selected".

The proposal to amend the ICC's constitution has arisen from the rejection of John Howard for the post of vice-president last year. "It's inevitable that the process to elect the president should come under review yet again," Morgan said in reference to Howard's rejection last year. Morgan, who was the head of the body from 2008-2010, said: "Any change in the system for electing the president (should) ensure that the best available person actually becomes president."

Morgan, however, is dead against the idea of presidents enjoying unlimited or timeless terms, which many believe is the brainchild of the BCCI. "I have heard rumours of a new system involving unlimited or timeless terms of office for the president and believe that would not be good."

Among the new proposals to be discussed in Hong Kong, is to grant authority to ICC's 16-member Executive Board to "discuss the process and term of office (of president) from time to time". As of now, voting power rests with the 10 full-member nations, who need a two-third majority to pass a decision, in the ICC executive board.

Pakistan to oppose
The proposal is expected to be met with vehement opposition from Pakistan and Bangladesh, who are scheduled to nominate the body's next leader to take power from 2014.

"It's Pakistan's turn to nominate the president or the vice-president, so we will not allow anyone to snatch that right," said PCB chief Ijaz Butt. "We have already shown our reservations on both the amendments, and since the matter will be discussed, I am not going to make it more public."