‘Pakistan cricket needs a revolution’ | cricket | Hindustan Times
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‘Pakistan cricket needs a revolution’

Former Pakistan captain Imran Khan has called on the Interntional Cricket Council (ICC) to intensify efforts to stamp out corruption in the sport.

cricket Updated: May 02, 2011 23:49 IST
Reuters/ IANS

Former Pakistan captain Imran Khan has called on the Interntional Cricket Council (ICC) to intensify efforts to stamp out corruption in the sport.

The cricketer turned politician told reporters during a visit to the Moin Khan cricket academy the ICC’s anti-corruption and security unit needed to be more productive.

“I think specal measures are required like keeping a constant check on assets and accounts of players and giving the ACSU more authority to curb corruption,” Imran said.

“What Pakistan cricket needs is a revolution,” said Imran, who is now an active politician and heads the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaaf (PTI) party. “We will have to root out corruption and nepotism from our cricket.”

Imran lamented that Pakistan today lags behind countries like Australia and India.

“Australia made enormous progress because of a solid domestic structure while India has boosted its cricket by introducing the IPL,” he said.
Imran said the International Cricket Council (ICC) will have to do more to curb match fixing.

Imran’s comments on corruption in cricket come a few days after former Sri Lankan captain Hashan Tillakaratne claimed in a television interview that match-fixing had been going on in his country since 1992.

The Sri Lankan cricket authorities have asked Tillakaratne to produce evidence to back up his claims.

Imran said it was very difficult to detect spot-fixing instances in matches, insisting other steps were required to meet the challenge of fighting corruption.

“It is very hard to detect such things and than find evidence to prove spot fixing has happened in a match,” he said.

“But the more these instances are spoken about the more damaging it is to the sport’s credibility.”