SA charges the guilty, focus on India now | cricket | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Dec 18, 2017-Monday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

SA charges the guilty, focus on India now

The news of the action on Gerald Majola, the suspended Cricket South Africa (CSA) CEO, is being followed with interest by the Indian cricket fraternity. Following the intervention by the SA government, Majola has been asked to repay the nearly two million rands (Rs 1.36 cr) he paid himself as bonus during the 2009 Indian Premier League without informing the CSA.

cricket Updated: May 01, 2012 01:23 IST
HT Correspondent

The news of the action on Gerald Majola, the suspended Cricket South Africa (CSA) CEO, is being followed with interest by the Indian cricket fraternity. Following the intervention by the SA government, Majola has been asked to repay the nearly two million rands (Rs 1.36 cr) he paid himself as bonus during the 2009 Indian Premier League without informing the CSA.

Majola, who was CEO from 2000 to 2012, got into trouble when it was raised in an audit report as an irregularity. He was let off with a caution following an investigation by the South African board before the SA government set up its inquiry.

At the root of the controversy is the 2009 IPL. It's the same edition when Indian authorities started training their guns on the T20 league. Following its investigations, the central government has claimed that violations of huge sums of money took place. That begs the question: Why, unlike the SA government, investigations by the Indian authorities have lost momentum after the report of the Standing Committee on Finance.http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/Popup/2012/4/01_05_pg-18b.jpg

Following a government report, investigating the Indian board and its management of the IPL, in November 2011, the BCCI was served with 19 show-cause notices by the Directorate of Enforcement for alleged Foreign Exchange Management Act (FEMA) violations.

The BCCI's alleged FEMA violations are believed to have occurred when it moved the tournament to South Africa.

The various government agencies inquiring into allegations have put the amount being sought from the Board and its stakeholders at over R1600 crore.

Lalit Modi, the then IPL commissioner, is seen as the man who can lead the investigation to its conclusion. But not enough efforts are being made to either bring him to India or interrogate him in London.