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Tanveer's triple strike leaves South Africa in bother

Pakistan's debutant paceman Tanveer Ahmed claimed three wickets in 29 balls to leave South Africa in a spot of bother at 114-3 at lunch on the first day of the second Test today.

cricket Updated: Nov 20, 2010 14:21 IST

Pakistan's debutant paceman Tanveer Ahmed claimed three wickets in 29 balls to leave South Africa in a spot of bother at 114-3 at lunch on the first day of the second Test here on Saturday.

The 31-year-old dismissed opener Alviro Petersen (two) off the third ball of his career and then had Hashim Amla (four) off the eighth before removing captain Graeme Smith (10) after Pakistan won the toss and decided to bowl.

Jacques Kallis, who completed his 55th half-century, was unbeaten on 57 and have added 81 runs for the fourth wicket with AB de Villiers, unbeaten on 33 at the break.

Kallis has so far hit two sixes and nine boundaries in his fighting 65-ball knock. It was Ahmed who exploited the early morning moisture on the newly laid pitch at the Abu Dhabi Stadium, which became the 103rd Test venue after Dubai, where the first Test ended in a draw on Tuesday.

Ahmed justified Misbah-ul-Haq's decision to bowl first by getting an edge off Petersen to the first slip, where the Pakistan captain took a well-judged catch. Amla received a shocking decision by Sri Lankan umpire Asoka De Silva when he was adjudged caught behind off Ahmed in the fourth over of the innings.

Television replays showed that the ball brushed his pads. Smith, who took 20 balls to score his first run, edged Ahmed to wicket-keeper Adnan Akmal to leave South Africa struggling at 33-3 before Kallis and De Villiers started the fight back.

Pakistan made three changes to their first Test line-up, dropping Umar Akmal, Saeed Ajmal and injured Wahab Riaz. Ahmed and Asad Shafiq, making their debuts, plus Mohammad Sami took their places. South Africa remained unchanged.