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The Cup that may brighten up Pakistan

For others winning this World Cup could be a matter of pride and glory for the country. For Pakistan, which has won a World Cup and hosted a final, a lot more is at stake.

cricket Updated: Feb 17, 2011 02:26 IST
Nilankur Das

For others winning this World Cup could be a matter of pride and glory for the country. For Pakistan, which has won a World Cup and hosted a final, a lot more is at stake.

A terror attack on the Sri Lanka team bus in Lahore in 2009 had put an end to Pakistan playing international matches at home and also taken away its rights to host World Cup ties. The country shredded by blasts and violence is now forced to host its international matches in Dubai.

Play to prove
Winning this World Cup, coach Waqar Younis feels, could change all that and pave the way to bring international cricket back to the country.

“It is unfortunate that we are not hosting. Yes, we are missing World Cup matches at home. But if we play as a unit, which we are at the moment and go on to win, I believe it will definitely help get international matches back to Pakistan,” Waqar said after Pakistan began their campaign with a win in a warm-up match against Bangladesh.

“Everyone back home is disappointed that the World Cup is not happening in Pakistan. But we are looking forward. Violence has taken international cricket away from the country but I am sure our cricket will bring cricket back,” Intikhab Alam, Pakistan's first one-day captain who is the manager of the team here, told HT.

Ccricket Buzz
Back in Pakistan which is celebrating Id-e- Milad-un-Nabi, the birthday of Prophet Mohammad, cricket, it was learnt, is the buzz now.

“I think the people of Pakistan have already come to terms with the World Cup not happening here. Tuesday's match was not on TV and so very few people could follow it. But people are keeping track and everywhere I went I heard cricket being discussed,” spokesperson of the Pakistan Cricket Board, Nadeem Sarwar told HT from Lahore.

“What Waqar said is right. But it will not happen overnight. Winning the World Cup will surely have a unifying effect on the country and if that means law and order is restored, the other boards too will not have problems sending their teams to Pakistan.

“We are making progress in this regard. The Afghanistan team was here. And now the Nepal women’s team is playing a T20 and one-day series here,” Sarwar said.

It’s still early days but a motto like this can definitely keep the team together. But sport has its share of such instances. When Spain, with a majority of Catalan players led by a man from Real Madrid, went on to win the football World Cup, a month-long euphoria blurred all differences.