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What BCCI could have found wrong with Hawk-Eye

The Hawk-Eye technology predicts the path of a ball. Bounce and deviation off the surface are two key aspects under its scrutiny.

cricket Updated: Jun 28, 2011 02:39 IST

The Hawk-Eye technology predicts the path of a ball. Bounce and deviation off the surface are two key aspects under its scrutiny.

Bounce
The bounce depends on several factors including the height from which the ball is delivered, the pace and length of the ball, the hardness of the pitch and the amount of grass on it, which part of the ball hits the pitch, how old the ball is and the amount of moisture in the pitch.

Question: Does the DRS have enough data on all these factors to predict accurately how much the ball will bounce?

Deviation
This includes how much the ball will move or spin after pitching.

When not spinning: The movement is either off the seam or some other part of the ball. Apart from the angle and height the ball is delivered from, the hardness of the seam depending on how old the ball is plays a big role in determining the amount of deviation. The same applies when the ball is moving despite the seam not hitting the pitch. The amount of grip the ball is getting off the pitch is also a key factor as is the wind.http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/HTEditImages/Images/28_06_pg21c.jpg

When spinning: The amount of spin depends on the number of rotations on the ball. There can be a spot on the pitch that offers different kind of grip and makes the ball spin more or less (like the bowlers' footmarks).

Question: Can the DRS device predict accurately which spot of the pitch offers how much turn? Also, how does it predict how much the ball will turn when it hits the pad just after hitting the pitch without having travelled enough to give anyone an idea of how it'll behave?