Japanese tech to be adopted for averting landslides in U’khand | dehradun | Hindustan Times
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Japanese tech to be adopted for averting landslides in U’khand

At a given location, the experts will build two small dams for holding the debris that comes along with the stream and blocks the road underneath. Thereafter, the slope will be cut and hydroseeding done. Hydroseeding involves injecting seeds with machines on the mountain slopes to help grow grass and plants. This in turn will hold the top soil and avoid erosion.

dehradun Updated: Jul 26, 2017 20:29 IST
Nihi Sharma
The Japanese team with project chief director Anup Malik in Dehradun on Wednesday.
The Japanese team with project chief director Anup Malik in Dehradun on Wednesday. (Vinay Santosh Kumar/HT)

DEHRADUN: Japanese experts have suggested cost effective measures to check landslides at three places in Uttarakhand.

Under the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) project, Neergard near Rishikesh, Jowari 2 in Rudraprayag and Padli in Nainital will be developed as model places for the scheme which can be replicated in other places of the state and the country.

Comprising mostly of hill terrain, Uttarakhand is prone to landslide, tremor and other natural disasters. In June 2013, floods and landslides left several thousands of people dead, missing and injured in the Kedar Valley. Properties worth several crores were either damaged or completely destroyed in the flashfloods.

“Japan does not have cost constraint and that’s why the country is able to engage engineering which is expensive and viable. For India, we understand cost restriction and that’s why have come up with measures like building small dams, concrete carpet and hydroseeding which will help in holding the mountains,” Humihiko Yokoo, team leader and expert in landslide engineering, told Hindustan Times on Wednesday.

At a given location, the experts will build two small dams for holding the debris that comes along with the stream and blocks the road underneath. Thereafter, the slope will be cut and hydroseeding done. Hydroseeding involves injecting seeds with machines on the mountain slopes to help grow grass and plants. This in turn will hold the top soil and avoid erosion.

Concrete carpet will be constructed in the second and the third sites. Hydroseeding will be undertaken in these carpets that look like mesh net. The carpet like surface will help in holding the top soil.

“Within five years, we will be able to adopt the proposed mitigation measures. Landslides in Sikkim is worst, and we will like to extend our support to that state too,” deputy chief representative of the project, Toru Uemachi said.