Search for threatened Finn’s weaver starts in Kumaon | dehradun | Hindustan Times
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Search for threatened Finn’s weaver starts in Kumaon

The bird was first spotted in Uttarakhand in the 50’s by eminent ornithologist Dr Salim Ali.

dehradun Updated: May 13, 2017 21:07 IST
Nihi Sharma
The search for Finn's Weaver is on in the Kumaon and Terai regions.
The search for Finn's Weaver is on in the Kumaon and Terai regions. (HT Photo)

The Uttarakhand forest department has begun a survey to spot Finn’s weaver, also known as the yellow weaver, which was last sighted in Haldwani in 2010.

The search for the rare bird is on in the Kumaon and Terai regions.

The ‘relict’ species is found in Manas and Kaziranga national parks in Assam, in Salt Lake in West Bengal and also parts of Uttar Pradesh adjoining the terai region.

Forest officers have roped in the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) to do intensive research. The six-month project began in April and will end in September. This period is significant for the study as the species breeds during this season.

“The breeding season starts in May and goes on till September. This is the best time of the year to study it (Finn’s weaver). We started the ground work in April and have started surveying the area in May. We are looking for its nesting sites and other indications of its presence,” said Suresh Kumar, a scientist working with WII, who is leading the project.

The objective of the study is to establish its presence. The terai region has reported rapid industrialisation, which is believed to be the main reason behind the bird’s disappearance.

“Terai was the only area in Uttarakhand where the bird was reported. Certainly, developmental activity and industrialisation took its toll,” Dhananjay Mohan, additional principal chief conservator of forest (APCCF) added.

The bird is found near agricultural fields and around Semal trees.

Yellow weaver was first spotted in Uttarakhand in the 50’s by eminent ornithologist Dr Salim Ali.