U’khand govt to introduce a law to conserve dying local dialects | dehradun | Hindustan Times
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U’khand govt to introduce a law to conserve dying local dialects

The Uttarakhand government will soon introduce a dedicated law to provide a legal back up to efforts being made to conserve fast dying dialects

dehradun Updated: Oct 02, 2017 19:39 IST
Deep Joshi
The Draft Bhasha Sansthan Bill, 2017, is likely to be tabled in the next assembly session.
The Draft Bhasha Sansthan Bill, 2017, is likely to be tabled in the next assembly session.(HT File)

The Uttarakhand government will soon introduce a dedicated law to provide a legal back up to efforts being made to conserve fast dying dialects - Kumaoni, Garhwali, Jaunsari and Rang, the latter two spoken in tribal areas.

The Draft Bhasha Sansthan Bill, 2017 is likely to be tabled in the next assembly session, language and parliamentary affairs minister Prakash Pant said.

“The proposed law is being brought in to give a legal backing to efforts being made to conserve all dialects including those spoken in tribal areas,” he said.

“Under the proposed law, conservation of all dying local languages besides Hindi, Urdu and Punjabi would be carried out by four academies,” Pant said referring to Hindi, Urdu, Punjabi and Lok Bhasha (local dialects) academies.

“All these (academies) will be under the jurisdiction of Bhasha Sansthan, which will work as an umbrella body,” he said.

So far, the four academies and the Bhasha Sansthan had been working independent of one another, the minister said.

Officials, however, said all those five bodies were engaged in conserving the local dialects as well as languages such as Hindi, Urdu and Punjabi.

“The multiplicity of organisations doing the same work is not just leading to duplication of conservation work,” an official said.“Officials and experts from the five bodies doing the same work has also posed a heavy burden on the exchequer,” he told HT.

Besides, hardly any land was available to construct separate buildings to house each of the five bodies including the Bhasha Sansthan. “That problem will be taken care of because all those five bodies, once consolidated, would be housed in one building,” the official said.

Dr Sarita Mohan, the joint director of the higher education department, described the move to enact a new law to bring all the four academies under the Bhasha Sansthan as “timely and important”.

“It is a crucial and timely move as it will help conserve all local dialects, which are fast dying,” she said, adding that as per a UNESCO report, Kumaoni and Garhwali - the two main dialects spoken in the mountain state - were vanishing fast.

Minister Pant said the proposed law “stipulates that apart from the local dialects, ‘Rang’ and ‘Jaunpuri the tribal languages spoken in Pithoragarh and Jausar Bhabhar (Dehradun) are” also conserved.

“It (proposed law) also stipulates that all documents pertaining to local dialects are properly documented and preserved. The proposed law also makes it mandatory for the government to encourage all writers writing in local languages by felicitating them time-to-time and providing them financial aid,” the minister said.