100 offered jobs in Tihar placements | delhi | Hindustan Times
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100 offered jobs in Tihar placements

One hundred Tihar inmates once released from the high security prison can hope for a fresh start - with a job in hand. More than a dozen recruiters - from security companies, construction firms and hospitality sector - offered jobs to 100 convicts and undertrials. Jatin Anand reports. In pics

delhi Updated: Nov 16, 2011 01:27 IST
Jatin Anand

One hundred Tihar inmates once released from the high security prison can hope for a fresh start - with a job in hand.

On Tuesday more than a dozen recruiters - from security companies, construction firms and hospitality sector - offered jobs to 100 convicts and undertrials. Some were even picked by more than one company.

A graduate in humanities, Sandeep Kumar Singh was offered the position of a business development manager for an annual remuneration of Rs 6 lakh. A sessions court found him guilty of abduction, a verdict he has challenged in the Delhi high court.

"When I was sent here on July 7, 2007, I was only a graduate. Now, I'm about to complete masters in tourism and also have a diploma in social work," said Singh, who comes from Kanpur in Uttar Pradesh.

Two more inmates, who didn't wish to be identified, have been offered a similar package.

A woman undertrial has been promised Rs 3 lakh annually for a managerial position in a hotel.

"We've been providing basic computer training to inmates but without an adequate opportunity, it meant little," said Sudhir Kumar Jha, a representative of the Vedanta Foundation.

The NGO, which furthers the mining giant's social responsibility initiative, got the recruiters to Tihar.

Vedanta Foundation recruited 19 inmates for various jobs within the mining group.

The job plan is an attempt by the jail authorities to ensure that once released, former inmates can earn a living and don't take to crime.

Every three months, the authorities draw up a list of inmates set for release in six months or a year. Candidates are shortlisted and trained for 15 days before sitting for a placement interview.

Ten people picked during a similar placement drive in July are working regular jobs and jail authorities have had no complaints so far.