20 pc less rain for Delhi this year | delhi | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
May 26, 2017-Friday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

20 pc less rain for Delhi this year

After bringing in the much-needed showers, monsoon is once again playing truant in the Capital. The temperatures are rising again, almost touching 40-degrees Celsius on Sunday, and the weatherman said chances of rainfall were bleak, reports Avishek G Dastidar.

delhi Updated: Jul 06, 2009 00:28 IST
Avishek G Dastidar

After bringing in the much-needed showers, monsoon is once again playing truant in the Capital.

The temperatures are rising again, almost touching 40-degrees Celsius on Sunday, and the weatherman said chances of rainfall were bleak.

Delhiites will have to just get used to it.

This year, while the entire country is staring at a poor monsoon, Delhi and adjoining regions—Northwest India—is expected to get the least amount of rainfall compared to other parts of the country.

According to the India Meteorological Department (IMD), Delhi and adjoining regions will be getting 20 per cent less rainfall than what is considered normal here.

Other regions-Central, South peninsula, and Northeastern India-are likely to receive much more, between 93 and 99 per cent of their normal monsoon rains.

“The four broad geographical regions are expected to get less monsoon. Delhi and nearby regions are likely to receive 81 per cent of the normal amount of rainfall,” said B.P. Yadav, director, IMD.

Last year, Delhi received 95 per cent of its 618 mm of rainfall over three monsoon months.

Spoiling Delhi’s monsoon party is the Bay of Bengal, which is not producing clouds or rain systems strong enough to reach the Capital's skies.

"At present, there are no signs of sustained rainfall because clouds are fizzling out before causing any rain," said OP Sharma, chief meteorologist, Skymet, a private weather forecaster.

The month of July, when monsoon sees some of its wettest days, has had its shares of lows in the recent past.

The driest July was in 2004, when it rained only around 40 mm against an expected amount of 231 mm.

The wettest July came a couple of years later, in 2006, when it rained as much as 196 mm.

“This is the month that in many ways outlines the character of monsoon in Delhi, and looking at this year’s scenario so far, it does not look good,” Sharma said.