$238 trail led to prize catch | delhi | Hindustan Times
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$238 trail led to prize catch

A transfer of $238.78 made through the Western Union conclusively established the Pakistani identity of the conspirators of the 26/11 Mumbai terrorist strikes, reports Tushar Srivastava.

delhi Updated: Feb 13, 2009 00:48 IST
Tushar Srivastava

A transfer of $238.78 made through the Western Union conclusively established the Pakistani identity of the conspirators of the 26/11 Mumbai terrorist strikes.

Following the trail the Pakistani investigators managed to track down Javed Iqbal, who has been accused of acquiring the Voice over Internet Protocol connections from Spain.

Out of the six arrests made by the Pakistani authorities, Iqbal and Mohammed Ashfaq had been named by India in its Mumbai attacks dossier shared with Islamabad and other countries.

Iqbal was lured from Barcelona, Spain to Pakistan where he was arrested. “Don’t ask how we got him here. He was lured to Pakistan and arrested. We have requested the Spanish government to cooperate,” said Pakistan’s Interior Ministry chief Rehman Malik.

Malik accepted that the probe relating to the telephone calls and bank transfers were a key to the investigation. “Tracing telephone calls and bank transfers had led to the capture of a key figure in the conspiracy, Hammad Amin Sadiq,” Malik said.

The Mumbai attacks dossier had clearly stated Iqbal and Ashfaq’s roles in the run-up to the 26/11 attacks.

The VoIP account was set-up with a US company, Callphonex, the Indian dossier had stated.

The account was activated by a money gram transferred in the name of Mohammed Ashfaq.

The account was paid for by a money transfer of $238.78 through Western Union by one Javed Iqbal who provided, as a form of identification, a Pakistani passport (No. KC 092481).

Indian intelligence agencies monitored calls between the terrorists at the Taj Mahal hotel and the virtual number — 12012531824.

The Pakistan-based handlers used the number to contact a mobile phone with one of the terrorists.

Iqbal has also been accused of opening three e-mail accounts used for sending e-mails and communication by the accused.

Sadiq, meanwhile, has been described as the “main operator” whose interrogation had led to raids on two hideouts in Pakistan.