3 plants to turn garbage into power | delhi | Hindustan Times
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3 plants to turn garbage into power

With civic bodies expediting the work of waste-to-energy projects, a garbage-free Delhi is all set to turn into a reality. HT reports.

delhi Updated: May 25, 2012 22:58 IST
HT Correspondent

With civic bodies expediting the work of waste-to-energy projects, a garbage-free Delhi is all set to turn into a reality.


While the Okhla plant has become operational, the Ghazipur plant is all set to start work and the Narela-Bawana Plant in North Delhi will see the light of the day in 2013.

The newly-developed plant will convert garbage into manure and eco-bricks. Besides, it will also generate electricity.

The North Delhi Municipal Corporation (NDMC) is, however, dissatisfied with the slow progress of the project.

Mahender Nagpal, leader of the house, said the contractor concerned was not fulfilling the terms and conditions of the agreement.

“Construction on the Rs 350-crore waste to energy plant has already started and officials claim that it would be completed in time,” he added.

“Initially, we will produce 13MW power, which will serve a population of around 2.5 lakh. This will be done by burning around 1,300 tonnes of waste generated in North Delhi every day. We have the capacity to burn around 4,000 tonnes of waste in a day,” said Sanjiv Kumar, project director.

Delhi, which generates around 8,000 tonnes of waste generated by over 1.6 crore Delhiites on a daily basis, has been struggling to dispose of the solid waste. With three major landfill sites — Bhalswa, Gazipur and Okhla already overflowing with garbage, there was no other option to dispose of the garbage instead of dumping it. The three plants, when fully functional, will produce 100MW electricity, catering to the future power consumption need of the city.

“Bricks manufactured here will be available for commercial institute once we get quality clearance from the Central Building Research Institute,” said Kumar.