50,000 vuvuzelas to keep the spirits high during the event | delhi | Hindustan Times
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50,000 vuvuzelas to keep the spirits high during the event

To make the Commonwealth Games a noisy affair, 50,000 vuvuzelas — to be sold by the Games Organisers — have just arrived in the Capital to turn up the decibel levels at the stadiums.

delhi Updated: Sep 27, 2010 23:41 IST
Avishek G Dastidar

To make the Commonwealth Games a noisy affair, 50,000 vuvuzelas — to be sold by the Games Organisers — have just arrived in the Capital to turn up the decibel levels at the stadiums.

The new vuvuzelas are bigger and make more noise than the previous lot of a few hundred ones that were launched along with other merchandise about two weeks ago.

They are around R100 costlier than the earlier ones and are ready to make the typical drone of the vuvuzelas, the defining sound of the Games.

But the organisers have decided not to sell these blow-horns to children that hit the headlines during this year's FIFA World Cup for creating nuisance with its collective noise in the stands, as it can be an ideal tool for ruckus.
"It is the most popular merchandise but we are not selling them to children in schools because they make noise," said Suresh Kumar, chairman of Premiere Brands, the official merchandising company for the Games.

The merchandising van is visiting schools and taking orders from school management to reach the target market of children.
But that may not stop the Games from being noisy because the vuvuzela is just one of the many noise-making instruments that are being sold as merchandise.

There are bugles of various sizes, drums and even bongos bearing the CWG Delhi emblem that spectators can buy and take to the stadiums.

"All these items have been allowed to be taken to the events, so that's why we are selling them," said a merchandise official.

The vuvuzela, though, is by far the most popular of the items. The merchandisers had bookings for 4,300 vuvuzelas even before they arrived in the city. “We are going door-to-door, through retailers and our vans,” said Kumar.
When blown together in a stadium, the collective drone of the vuvuzelas was described in the international media as "a thousand bees buzzing together".