An MP who's been in the house since its birth | delhi | Hindustan Times
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An MP who's been in the house since its birth

For Rishang Keishing (92), the world of Indian Parliament had opened up through the window of a train. After getting elected from Manipur in the first Lok Sabha in 1952, it took four days for him to reach Delhi.

delhi Updated: May 12, 2012 00:44 IST
Saubhadra Chatterji

For Rishang Keishing (92), the world of Indian Parliament had opened up through the window of a train.

After getting elected from Manipur in the first Lok Sabha in 1952, it took four days for him to reach Delhi.

"I had to board an overcrowded train to Delhi at Katihar. The police somehow pushed me inside it through a window," Keishing, now a Rajya Sabha member, recalls.

For the first time, the man from Bungpa Khunou village saw India beyond Assam.

"I was awestruck when I entered Parliament. I entered the Lok Sabha and saw stalwarts like Jawaharlal Nehru and Maulana Azad sitting across me. I had only seen their pictures in newspapers. I thanked God for the day," he tells HT.

Three other MPs of 1952 Lok Sabha are alive: Resham Lal Jangade (Bilaspur constituency), Kamal Singh (Shahabad-North-West) and Kandala Subrahmanyam (Vizianagaram). But they are leading retired lives.

Keishing is politically active and his memory remains razor-sharp. He recalls his first meeting with Nehru: He spotted the Prime Minister in the Parliament corridor and called out to him. The Prime Minister turned back. Keishing asked if some emissaries of Zapu Phizo (the secessionist Naga leader) can meet him.

"No, No, No" Nehru snapped back and questioned why a handful of Naga leaders refuse to accept India's authority. Keishing, a die-hard Indian nationalist, hit back: "Why are you shouting at me? I have just come to hear 'yes' or 'no'."

"Nehru followed me and caught me by my arm after a few minutes. He said they should first meet the home minister," Keishing recalls.

His closest association was with Indira Gandhi. Keishing, then a minister in Manipur, came to meet her and she said, you become the chief minister.

"I said I belong to a small tribe and she replied, 'In democracy, the size of your community doesn't matter. What matters is the confidence of people'."

After his first Rajya Sabha term, Keishing requested Sonia Gandhi to let him retire.

"Soniaji threw a dinner party. After dinner, I walked up to her to say goodbye. She told me, 'you are re-nominated. Now you rush back to Imphal to file your nomination papers'."

The biggest regret of the MP is, of course, the deteriorating standard of parliamentary practice.

"It was so quiet and peaceful. Today's disruptions don't help much," Keishing says.