Auditory traffic signals to help visually impaired | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Auditory traffic signals to help visually impaired

Delhi Police will soon introduce a unique auditory signalling system in the city to ensure safe crossover for the visually challenged. Subhendu Ray reports.

delhi Updated: Sep 21, 2011 23:57 IST
Subhendu Ray

Soon visually impaired people can have a safe crossover at busy intersections in the national capital.


Delhi Police will soon introduce a unique auditory signalling system in the city to ensure safe crossover for the visually challenged. Auditory traffic signals will have a pre-recorded voice traffic guidance or instrumental music traffic guidance attached to existing traffic signals.

In the existing system lights for pedestrians turn green for 40 seconds in each cycle. In the new system, audio will be played for the first 20 seconds. The pre-recorded voice alert or musical alert, signalling it is safe to crossover, will be heard when the pedestrian lights turn green.

"Once the system is in place, a visually challenged pedestrian will be able to cross the road without any fear or help from others," said Satyendra Garg, joint commissioner of police (traffic).

Delhi Police have already installed this system in two places — Janpath-Tolstoy Marg crossing and Rajpath in C Hexagon. "Similar arrangements will be seen at Tilak Marg, Shahjahan Road, Barakhamba-Tolstoy Marg crossing, INA Market and Satya Marg within a couple of months," said Garg.

Garg said in the next phase such a system would be operational at "all the signals in Delhi". There are 108 pedestrian traffic signals in the city.

CMS and Caltron are the two agencies that install and maintain traffic signals in Delhi on behalf of traffic police. Both agencies have been directed to install auditory signalling system at the already identified intersections.

"Every year two to three visually challenged people lose their lives in road accidents while crossing roads. They cannot see the signals and consequently cannot follow traffic rules. Once this system is in place, they can safely cross roads," said Shobhit Yadav, secretary of the National Blind Youth Association (NBYA).