Ayodhya: govt says it's not expecting trouble after verdict | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Ayodhya: govt says it's not expecting trouble after verdict

Days ahead of the crucial Ayodhya title verdict, the Centre tonight said it was not expecting trouble after the pronouncement of the judgement as people have moved on from the days of 1992 when the Babri mosque was demolished.

delhi Updated: Sep 21, 2010 23:55 IST

Days ahead of the crucial Ayodhya title verdict, the Centre tonight said it was not expecting trouble after the pronouncement of the judgement as people have moved on from the days of 1992 when the Babri mosque was demolished.

Home Secretary Gopal K Pillai said the judgement will come at a very conducive time, well after the Friday prayers of Muslims and hours before the two-day weekend break of Saturday and Sunday begins.

"India has moved on from 1992. The scenario has changed and (it is) totally different from what it was in 1992. It is 2010. I think people have shown much maturity now," Pillai said at a conference here.

The Home Secretary said the government's assessment has come following the statements made by different Hindu and Muslim groups fighting the title suit.

"This is more like a semi-final. The judgement comes out on Friday afternoon-- very well timed after 3.30-- so that Friday prayers are over. Saturdays and Sundays are holidays. And on Monday one can go to the Supreme Court and get a stay.

"So, by the time you decide what you really want to do, you are back again to the status quo," he said at the conference organised by the Observer Research Foundation on Indo-US strategic relations.

The Allahabad High Court will pronounce the long awaited verdict on Ayodhya title suit on Friday.

Earlier, Pillai pointed out that India had three security issues -- externally sponsored threat which is prevalent in Jammu and Kashmir, ethnic identity issues especially in the northeast of the country and internal armed movement or the Naxalite problem in some states.